Death of Innocence – The Murder of Ronnie Anderson

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-hpykg-fd43f1

It has been 54 years since this disabled boy was used as a pawn in a sadistic game and then slaughtered by the Dixie Mafia. His sister, Phyllis is still chasing justice and fighting for answers in the death of Ronnie Anderson.

 

Read more about Ronnie in Synova’s Book: Silenced By The Dixie Mafia: The Anderson Files

https://tinyurl.com/b7j47dj4

 

Mourning an Angel – Murder of Lyman Bostock

Photo courtesy of Pinterest

The Chicago White Sox defeated the California Angels on the afternoon of September 23, 1978. The loss was especially tough because it put them six games behind the Kansas City Royals with only seven games remaining in the regular season.

The Angels won the following day, and the Royals lost, meaning the Halos’ slim playoff chances were still alive. But the team was feeling far worse after the win than after the loss the day before.
Early that morning, one of their own, 27-year-old outfielder Lyman Bostock had been killed in a drive-by shooting.

Lyman Bostock spent his first three seasons in Major League Baseball (MLB) with the Minnesota Twins. A good defensive center fielder, Bostock also blossomed with the bat in 1976, finishing fourth in the American League with a .323 batting average.

Bostock was even better the following season, batting .336, good for second in the American League, behind his friend, teammate, and future Hall-of-Famer Rod Carew.

Bostock’s stellar performance came at the perfect time, as he became a free agent following the 1977 season. California Angels owner Gene Autry outbid the Twins, Yankees, and Padres for Bostock’s services, signing him to a five-year $2.3 million contract.

The Singing Cowboy was singing the praises of his new centerfielder, who he believed was a rising star.

Angels fans, and Bostock himself, however, were soon questioning Autry’s opening his pocketbook.

Bostock was off to an awful start in Anaheim. After batting only .150 for the month of April, he was so displeased with his performance that he offered to return his salary for the month to the team. Autry declined, saying the season was young and the team had faith in the young player.

Bostock’s performance did improve, but still not to his satisfaction. He accepted his pay for May but declined to keep it instead of giving it to various charities.

By summer, however, Bostock was in full swing, hitting .404 in June. Solid performances in July, August, and September followed, and the Angels’ new edition finally believed he was earning his money.

In the September 23 afternoon game against the Chicago White Sox at Comiskey Park, Bostick had two hits and a walk, but the Angels lost the game 5-4. California’s postseason hopes were on life support and would soon die.

That evening, the Angels centerfielder was also on life support; early the following morning, Lyman Bostock lost his life.

Bostock looked forward to games in Chicago because it allowed him to visit his uncle, Thomas Turner, who lived in Gary, Indiana, only 30 miles away.

After having dinner with relatives at Turner’s home on September 23, Bostock and his uncle went to visit a friend, Joan Hawkins, and her sister, Barbara Smith. Barbara was living with Joan after becoming estranged from her husband, Leonard. She had obtained a temporary restraining order against him four days earlier.

After the group finished dinner and chatted for a while, Thomas agreed to drive Joan and Barbara to their cousin’s house. Lyman Bostock and Barbara Smith rode in the back seat with Joan in the front passenger’s seat.

As the foursome entered the car, Leonard Smith was lurking outside the home and followed them as they departed. At 10:40 p.m., as the group was stopped at the intersection waiting for the light to change, Smith pulled his car alongside them, leaned out the window, and fired a shot into the back seat of Turner’s vehicle.

Smith tried to shoot Barbara, but Bostock was seated between her and the position from where Smith had fired. The bullet hit the ball player in his right temple. He was rushed to the hospital but died two hours later.

Barbara Smith was hospitalized with pellet wounds to her face but recovered.

Barbara Smith identified the shooter as her estranged husband Leonard, and he was arrested at his home.

Leonard Smith told police his ire was intended for Barbara, who he believed had repeatedly been unfaithful. Smith said he flew into a rage when he saw his wife and Bostock get into the back seat of the car together, believing they were on a date. The two, however, had only met when Bostock arrived at Joan’s home.

Smith said he had never met Bostock and did not know that he was a professional baseball player.

Smith was tried twice for Lyman Bostock’s murder, with his lawyers arguing that Barbara Smith’s alleged infidelity had driven him insane. The first trial resulted in a hung jury.

Smith was found not guilty by reason of insanity in the second trial. Psychiatrists declared him no longer mentally ill seven months later, and he was released.

The aftermath of Smith’s trial and verdict caused Indiana to change its insanity laws. The state legislature passed a bill mandating a person found to be insane at the time of the commission of a crime could still be found legally guilty and thus could be sent to prison if he or she was released from psychiatric treatment.

Following his release, Leonard Smith returned to Gary, Indiana, where he resided for the remainder of his life. In his later years, he moved into a high-rise apartment building for senior citizens only a few blocks from where he had shot Lyman Bostock.

Smith never again ran afoul of the law and declined all requests to comment on Lyman Bostock’s killing.

Leonard Smith died in 2010 at age 64.

The entire California Angels team attended Lyman Bostock’s funeral, as did many of his rival team players.

Among those who eulogized the ballplayer they lovingly called “Jibber-Jabber” were his Twins teammate Rod Carew and Angels teammates Bobby Grich and Ken Brett, bother of the future Hall-of-Famer George Brett.

All agreed the California Angel was now another kind of angel.

The Topps Company paid tribute to the slain ballplayer with an “In Memoriam” baseball card in its 1979 edition.

I am a card collector and have this card, as well as several others of Lyman Bostock.


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THIS LIST OF LINKS IS NOT AN ALL-ENCOMPASSING SOURCE CITING. ALL OF THE INFORMATION USED IN THIS ARTICLE CAN BE EASILY FOUND ONLINE. LINKS BELOW WERE USED AS SOURCES AND ARE RECOMMENDED READING FOR SYNOVA’S READERS. SYNOVA STRIVES TO CITE ALL THE SOURCES USED DURING HER CASE STUDY, BUT OCCASIONALLY A SOURCE MAY BE MISSED BY MISTAKE. IT IS NOT INTENTIONAL, AND NO COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT IS INTENDED.

Further Reading:


Chicago Tribune
ESPN
Los Angeles Times
The Sporting News


Lyman Bostock Jr. had baseball in his blood. The son of a former Negro League standout, Bostock began his professional career with the Minnesota Twins in 1975. Two years later, he became one of the first players in major league baseball to cash in on the new era of free agency, signing with the California Angels for more than $2 million—one of the richest contracts in sports history at that time. But Bostock’s true potential would never be known. On September 23, 1978, Bostock was shot and killed in Gary, Indiana. He was just 27 years old.


Synova’s podcast will be launching on March 31st! Follow the link below to subscribe so you won’t miss the debut episode!

https://chasingjusticepodcast.podbean.com/


More photos for this case can be found on Synova’s Patreon page! Check them using the button below Synova’s Patreon Page

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EACH WEEK SYNOVA HIGHLIGHTS OBSCURE COLD CASES ON HER BLOG AS A VICTIMS’ ADVOCATE WITH MISSOURI MISSING ORGANIZATION. SHE NEVER CHARGES FOR HER SERVICES. IF YOU’D LIKE TO SUPPORT HER IN THIS WORTHY CAUSE, PLEASE CHECK OUT THE AFFILIATE LINKS ON THIS PAGE. BY PURCHASING ONE OF HER BOOKS, OR USING THESE LINKS YOU WILL BE SUPPORTING SYNOVA’S WORK ON COLD CASES AND WILL ENSURE HER ABILITY TO CONTINUE TO GIVE A VOICE TO THE VICTIM’S FAMILY.


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More About Our Wonderful Guest Blogger:

Ian Granstra is a writer and a native Iowan now living in  Arkansas.Growing up, he enjoyed watching real-life crime shows and further researching the stories featured. He wrote about many of them on his personal Facebook page, and several people suggested he should start a group featuring his writings. Ian founded the Facebook group “Murders, Missing People and More Mysteries” in August of 2018 he writes about many cold cases. The group also features many current criminal cases in the news. When Ian isn’t writing, he enjoys exercising, traveling and collecting sports cards. He’s also a big animal lover (his Facebook nickname is “beagle lover.”)


ALL INFORMATION USED TO CREATE THIS CONTENT IS A MATTER OF PUBLIC RECORD AND CAN BE EASILY FOUND ONLINE OR CAN BE VERIFIED BY THE GUEST BLOGGER. ANY PARTICIPATION OR ALLEGED INVOLVEMENT OF ANY PARTY MENTIONED WITHIN THIS SITE IS PURELY SPECULATION. AS THE LAW STATES, AN INDIVIDUAL IS INNOCENT UNTIL PROVEN GUILTY. I DO NOT OWN THE PHOTOS USED IN THIS POST. ALL PHOTOS ARE USED UNDER THE FAIR USE ACT. NO COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT INTENDED. ANY AND ALL OPINIONS ARE THAT OF THE GUEST BLOGGER AND DON’T NECESSARILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF SYNOVA INK©2017-2020. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


Vanished But Not Forgotten

Twenty-eight-year-old Julie Weflen was a woman working in a man’s field. She was one of the few female power operators for the Bonneville Power Administration in Spokane, Washington. Almost everyone did a double-take when they saw the petite and attractive brunette working with power equipment.


Julie’s male coworkers often teased her, but it did not bother her because she knew the “guy talk” was all in good nature. Julie was a great worker. She had the men’s respect, and they had her back. The men felt guilty that they were not there for Julie when she needed them the most.


On September 16, 1987, a transformer at Spokane’s Springhill substation was registering low nitrogen levels. Julie said she would check it out. Her supervisor, Owen Berrio, told her it was nothing urgent, but diligent Julie said it was no bother and left to fix the problem. For thirty-three years, Owen has wished he would have then gone with her.
Julie left for the plant at approximately 2:00 p.m. and signed in at the Springhill substation at 2:30 p.m. She is believed to have completed her work around 3:30 p.m.


By nightfall, however, she had not returned, nor had she contacted anyone. Two colleagues went to the station to check on her, thinking the transformer’s problem may have been greater than thought.

When Julie’s coworkers arrived at Springhill, they found the nitrogen levels had been restored to normal. They also found Julie’s truck but no sign of her.


Thirty-three years later, Julie Weflen is still missing.

When BPA officials arrived at the plant, they came upon an ominous sight. The driver-side door and back hatch to Julie’s truck were open, and her personal items were strewn on the ground. These items included her hard hat, toolbox, sunglasses, and a bottle of water.

The police were called and found telltale signs of a struggle. There were drag marks in the gravel from the truck to where a fresh tire pattern. The tire tracks did not match those of Julie’s truck.

After concluding their investigation of the scene, police believed two people had abducted Julie.

As the Springhill substation was not on Julie’s usual route, her going to the plant had been a spur-of-the-moment decision.

Investigators believe Julie’s apparent abduction was a crime of opportunity. However, they do not dismiss the possibility that someone was stalking her.

Julie grew up in Portland, Oregon, and had been married to Mike Weflen for four years. The couple resided in Deer Park, 22 miles north of Spokane. By all accounts, the pair had a great relationship.

Mike was ruled out as a suspect in Julie’s disappearance as he was painting a house fifty miles away from Spokane at the time. Julie’s ex-husband was also investigated and cleared of any involvement.

Thousands of missing person’s flyers of Julie were distributed nationwide. Her disappearance received extensive national coverage, including being profiled on “America’s Most Wanted,” “Good Morning America,” and “West 57th”.

The publicity, however, failed to produce any solid leads.

Some investigators believe Julie’s abduction may be related to the disappearances of two other area women.


On March 29, 1986, one-and-a-half years before Julie’s disappearance, 30-year-old special education teacher Deborah Swanson disappeared from Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, 34 miles east of Spokane, Washington.

The circumstances of Deborah’s disappearance are somewhat similar to Julie’s. Her car was found locked and abandoned along an isolated trail. Her purse was found inside her car. Police believe Deborah was kidnapped while jogging along the trail.

Deborah also knew a man who lived near the Spokane substation from which Julie was abducted. The man refused to answer any questions when police attempted to ask him about the women’s disappearances. He is also believed to have mailed a threatening letter to Mike Weflen a few months after Julie’s disappearance.

A group member told me she recalled reading that this man knew both Deborah and Julie through the Spokane Mountaineering Club.

For many years this man, whom authorities have not named, has been considered a person of interest in Julie’s disappearance. He remains a person of interest in Deborah’s disappearance, but investigators have recently implied that he has been cleared of any involvement in Julie’s case.

The disappearance of another Coeur d’Alene woman is thought to be related to Julie Weflen and Deborah Swanson’s disappearances.

On May 16, 1986, seven weeks after Deborah’s disappearance and 16 months before Julie vanished, 20-year-old Sally Stone visited her physical therapist to treat an injured knee. After failing to show up for various appointments, she was reported missing.

Sally was an exotic dancer who had recently moved to Coeur d’Alene. All of her clothing and suitcases were found undisturbed in her apartment, although her purse was missing. Three days of newspapers had accumulated on her front porch, and a sizable insurance check lay unopened in her mailbox.

Sally, like Julie and Deborah, remains missing.

Three young women disappeared from a 35-mile radius within 14 months of one another. Nothing concretely links Deborah Swanson, Sally Stone, and Julie Weflen’s disappearances, but many investigators believe the cases are connected. Authorities have no solid suspects in any of the three disappearances.

No connection has been found between the three women.

Police have ruled out two infamous serial killers of the pacific northwest as suspects in Julie’s disappearance;

Gary Ridgway, also known as “Green River Killer,” murdered at least 49 women from 1982-98, and Robert Yates, the “Spokane Killer,” who confessed in 2000 to murdering 13 Spokane women and five other Washington women from 1975-98.

In a 2007 article in the Spokesman-Review, the Spokane Sheriff’s Department said they had received a tip regarding a person of interest in Julie’s disappearance.

A department spokesman said the man, now deceased, was interviewed and failed a polygraph test.

Authorities said Julie’s locker at the Springhill substation, from where she had disappeared, had been cleaned out after her disappearance and that nothing pertinent to her presumed abduction was found.

In 2011, 24 years after Julie’s disappearance, however, employees at the Bell substation discovered that her locker there was still padlocked shut.

The items retrieved from the Bell locker were put into a storage container for investigators to search. Police have not released any information relating to the contents, and it is unlikely they revealed anything substantive to her disappearance.

Though he is now remarried and has children, Mike Weflen continues searching for answers to Julie’s disappearance.

With his current wife’s support, he keeps in contact with investigators and continues to push for publicity of Julie’s case.

Julie’s friends and family raised $80,000 as a reward for information leading to her whereabouts or remains.

The reward is still offered, as is a separate $25,000 reward offered by the Bonneville Power Administration.

Julie Ann Weflen has been missing since September 16, 1987. At the time of her disappearance, she was 28-years-old, 5’2″ tall, and weighed 100 lbs. She had brown hair, brown eyes, and both of her ears were pierced. Julie also had a scar on her back and a metal rod inserted in her spine. She enjoyed horseback riding.

Julie Weflen would today be 61-years-old. If you believe you have information relating to her disappearance, please contact the Spokane County, Washington, Sheriff’s Office at 509-477-4760.

Deborah Swanson and Sally Stone were both last seen in Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, in 1986. Deborah disappeared on March 29; Sally on May 16.

At the time of her disappearance Deborah Jean Swanson was 30-years-old, 5’4″ inches tall, and weighed 130 lbs. She had blonde hair, green eyes, and both her ears were pierced. She worked as a special education teacher and would today be 66-years-old.

Sally Anne Stone was 21-years-old when she disappeared. At the time of her disappearance, she was 5’1″ tall and weighed 115 lbs. She had brown hair, hazel eyes, and a 5-6″ scar on her abdomen, possibly resulting from a Cesarean section. She had a tattoo on her right shoulder. It was of a parrot standing on a branch in front of a half-moon. Under the parrot is a ribbon with the word “Teko’s.” She also had another tattoo on her back.

Sally’s right knee was injured at the time of her disappearance. She worked as an exotic dancer under the stage name “Satania.” Sally Stone would today be 56-years-old.

Authorities have not found any proof that Deborah Swanson and Sally Stone’s disappearances are related to each other or the disappearance of Julie Weflen. Still, they also have not ruled out the possibility.

If you believe you have information regarding Deborah Swanson or Sally Stone’s disappearances, please contact the Coeur d’Alene, Idaho, Police Department 208-769-2320.


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THIS LIST OF LINKS IS NOT AN ALL-ENCOMPASSING SOURCE CITING. ALL OF THE INFORMATION USED IN THIS ARTICLE CAN BE EASILY FOUND ONLINE. LINKS BELOW WERE USED AS SOURCES AND ARE RECOMMENDED READING FOR SYNOVA’S READERS. SYNOVA STRIVES TO CITE ALL THE SOURCES USED DURING HER CASE STUDY, BUT OCCASIONALLY A SOURCE MAY BE MISSED BY MISTAKE. IT IS NOT INTENTIONAL, AND NO COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT IS INTENDED.


Further Reading:
• Charley Project
• Doe Network
• Idaho Spokesman-Review
• KXLY TC, ABC Affiliate, Spokane Washington
• Seattle Post Intelligencer
• Spokane Spokesman-Review
• Washington State Missing Persons


Synova’s podcast will be launching on March 31st! Follow the link below to subscribe so you won’t miss the debut episode!

https://chasingjusticepodcast.podbean.com/


More photos for this case can be found on Synova’s Patreon page! Check them using the button below Synova’s Patreon Page

Join Synova’s Patreon Here

Support Synova’s Cause:

EACH WEEK SYNOVA HIGHLIGHTS OBSCURE COLD CASES ON HER BLOG AS A VICTIMS’ ADVOCATE WITH MISSOURI MISSING ORGANIZATION. SHE NEVER CHARGES FOR HER SERVICES. IF YOU’D LIKE TO SUPPORT HER IN THIS WORTHY CAUSE, PLEASE CHECK OUT THE AFFILIATE LINKS ON THIS PAGE. BY PURCHASING ONE OF HER BOOKS, OR USING THESE LINKS YOU WILL BE SUPPORTING SYNOVA’S WORK ON COLD CASES AND WILL ENSURE HER ABILITY TO CONTINUE TO GIVE A VOICE TO THE VICTIM’S FAMILY.


If you enjoy this content don’t forget to sign up for The Racketeer, Synova’s Weekly True Crime Newsletter. You will receive exclusive content directly in your inbox. As a gift for joining you will also receive the Grim Justice ebook free.

SIGN UP HERE


More About Our Wonderful Guest Blogger:

Ian Granstra is a writer and a native Iowan now living in  Arkansas.Growing up, he enjoyed watching real-life crime shows and further researching the stories featured. He wrote about many of them on his personal Facebook page, and several people suggested he should start a group featuring his writings. Ian founded the Facebook group “Murders, Missing People and More Mysteries” in August of 2018 he writes about many cold cases. The group also features many current criminal cases in the news. When Ian isn’t writing, he enjoys exercising, traveling and collecting sports cards. He’s also a big animal lover (his Facebook nickname is “beagle lover.”)


ALL INFORMATION USED TO CREATE THIS CONTENT IS A MATTER OF PUBLIC RECORD AND CAN BE EASILY FOUND ONLINE OR CAN BE VERIFIED BY THE GUEST BLOGGER. ANY PARTICIPATION OR ALLEGED INVOLVEMENT OF ANY PARTY MENTIONED WITHIN THIS SITE IS PURELY SPECULATION. AS THE LAW STATES, AN INDIVIDUAL IS INNOCENT UNTIL PROVEN GUILTY. I DO NOT OWN THE PHOTOS USED IN THIS POST. ALL PHOTOS ARE USED UNDER THE FAIR USE ACT. NO COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT INTENDED. ANY AND ALL OPINIONS ARE THAT OF THE GUEST BLOGGER AND DON’T NECESSARILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF SYNOVA INK©2017-2020. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


Awakening to a Nightmare – The Murder of Jaclyn Dowaliby

David Dowaliby was not overly concerned when he awoke on Saturday, September 10, 1988. He and his son Davy had risen around 7:00 a.m., while David’s wife Cynthia and his step-daughter, seven-year-old Jaclyn, liked to sleep later. The routine was typical in the Midlothian, Illinois, home, 20 miles south of Chicago. The morning men joked about the lazy ladies.

Two hours later, Cynthia awoke and went to Jaclyn’s room. To her surprise, her daughter was not there. David and Cynthia assumed she was outside playing or that David’s mother Anna, who also lived with them, had taken her somewhere. However, after calling friends and searching the neighborhood, they found no one who had seen Jaclyn that morning.

The Dowalibys’ concern escalated into fear when Cynthia discovered a basement window had been broken. It appeared an intruder had used it to gain access to the home.

Four days later, Jaclyn’s body was found in a vacant field near Blue Island, four miles northeast of Midlothian. She had been strangled, and a 26-foot rope was still wrapped around her throat.

David and Cynthia Dowaliby’s nightmare was only beginning. They were soon charged with the murder of their daughter.

Before Jaclyn’s body was discovered, David and Cynthia each passed polygraph tests. David also took a second polygraph test, the results of which were inconclusive.

Despite passing the initial polygraph tests, David and Cynthia were both charged with Jaclyn’s murder two months later, in November 1988.

The police investigation into Jacyln’s murder concluded the basement window had to have been broken from the inside of the home because it would have been impossible for an intruder to enter without disturbing the items perched beneath the window.

Among these items were a nightstand, a TV tray, a towel rack, make-up, and nail polish. All of those items were undisturbed, causing investigators to believe the window had been broken from the inside in an effort to misdirect the investigation.

The Dowalibys’ trial began in April of 1990.

The prosecution produced a bloodstained pillow found in Jaclyn’s bedroom and introduced into evidence several head hairs similar to Jaclyn’s found in the trunk of her parents’ car. A neighbor also identified the rope. Apparently, the child used to play with it.

The physical evidence, however, was successfully refuted by the defense. The blood on the pillow could not be identified, and the hairs found in the trunk of the Dowalibys’ car could not be confirmed as Jaclyn’s. The prosecution’s case rested almost exclusively on circumstantial evidence.

Transit worker Everett Mann testified that on September 10, the evening Jaclyn disappeared, he had seen a man in a car parked near the area where Jacyln’s body would be found. From a police photo lineup, he identified the man as David. Two other eyewitnesses testified to seeing Cynthia’s car, a 1980 Chevy Malibu, in the area where Jaclyn’s body was found that evening.

Prosecutors attempted to portray David and Cynthia as angry parents. Half-brother Davy said Jaclyn was “spanked a lot” and yelled at by her parents. A member of our group who lives near the area also told me she had heard reports that David and Cynthia were angry that Jaclyn, at seven-years-old, was still wetting her bed.

David and Cynthia did not testify on their own behalf. Before closing arguments, the judge ruled there was insufficient evidence against Cynthia and acquitted her.

After three days of deliberation, though, the jury found David guilty of the murder of his step-daughter. He was sentenced to 45 years in prison.

However, after reviewing the case, Northwestern University Law Professor Rob Warden and Journalism Professor David Protess were convinced an injustice had been done.

Among Warden and Protess’s findings were all of the photographs in the police lineup viewed by Everett Mann were frontal shots, but he had seen the man in the parking lot only from the side. Most tellingly, however, the photo of David Dowaliby was 30% larger than the others. Because David’s photo was the most prominent, it was natural to stand out to a witness and be the one picked.

Standard police photograph procedure calls for all photos to be equal in size. The Northwestern academics believe the police, convinced of David’s guilt, led Everett Mann into identifying him.

Warden and Protess also proved that Cynthia Dowaliby’s car was parked in front of the couple’s house when the two witnesses claimed it was in the area where Jaclyn was found.

Warden and Protess believed the police investigation was conducted on the faulty assumption that the basement window had been broken from the inside. This concept led the investigation from then on, and the police didn’t look elsewhere.

The Dowalibys videotaped a neighbor crawling through the window from the outside. The physically fit neighbor was able to make his way into the basement by sliding through the window on his belly, wedging his foot on the wall, and easing his way into the home by hanging off the window ledge. He did not disturb the items on the nightstand.

Forensic analysis later confirmed the window had been broken from the outside. However, the broken window may have been a decoy, as the back door to the home had been left open the night Jaclyn was taken and, when David awoke the morning after, the front door was ajar. David assumed his mother had left home and forgotten to close the door.

Protess and television reporter Paul Hogan collaborated in a series of reports critical of the police investigation into Jaclyn’s murder.

The most significant criticism was the determination that the Illinois State Police evidence technician, whose primary responsibility was to collect all physical evidence, should have immediately collected the broken window glass. However, he waited three days before doing so and had to retrieve the shards from the trash.

The reports published by Warden and Protess led to a backlash against the police.

In October of 1991, the Illinois Court of Appeals unanimously overturned David Dowaliby’s murder conviction. He was released from prison after serving 18 months and exonerated of all charges relating to Jaclyn’s murder.

Convicted sex offender Perry Hernandez committed a similar abduction in Blue Island one year after Jaclyn’s murder. He abducted a seven-year-old girl from her bedroom and later sexually assaulted her. Hernandez released the girl approximately one mile from where Jaclyn’s body was found.

Illinois state police say Hernandez was investigated as a suspect in Jaclyn’s murder, but evidence found on her body did not match him, and he was cleared of any involvement.

Jaclyn’s biological uncle Timothy Guess is also a suspect in her murder. Guess a diagnosed schizophrenic claimed he was working at a local restaurant/bar on the night of Jaclyn’s murder. However, his boss and five regular patrons stated he was not working that night. Also, one of Guess’s original alibi witnesses later changed her story.

Protess says Guess told him that a “spirit” living inside him had told him details about Jaclyn’s murder. Guess also described the Dowaliby home’s layout, even though he had never been inside. Finally, Guess told Protess a light was on in Jaclyn’s closet, but not in her bedroom, on the evening she was abducted. That detail had not been released to the public.

Timothy Guess was never charged in the murder of his niece and died in 2002. No physical evidence has linked him to the murder.

The investigation into the murder of Jaclyn Dowaliby is officially still open, but many Chicago area journalists and reporters contend it is not being investigated.

The consensus is that all investigating agencies, the Midlothian and Blue Island Police Departments, along with the Illinois State Police, still believe David and/or Cynthia Dowaliby were responsible for Jaclyn’s murder.

David Protess and Rob Warden’s 1993 book “Gone in the Night” accounts for their investigation into the murder of Jaclyn Dowaliby.

Because of the publicity generated by their trial, David and Cynthia Dowaliby changed their names and moved out of Midlothian.

Even if new evidence were to surface linking them to Jaclyn’s murder, they could not be tried again because of the Double Jeopardy provision of the 5th Amendment of the Constitution.


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THIS LIST OF LINKS IS NOT AN ALL-ENCOMPASSING SOURCE CITING. ALL OF THE INFORMATION USED IN THIS ARTICLE CAN BE EASILY FOUND ONLINE. LINKS BELOW WERE USED AS SOURCES AND ARE RECOMMENDED READING FOR SYNOVA’S READERS. SYNOVA STRIVES TO CITE ALL THE SOURCES USED DURING HER CASE STUDY, BUT OCCASIONALLY A SOURCE MAY BE MISSED BY MISTAKE. IT IS NOT INTENTIONAL, AND NO COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT IS INTENDED.


More Info:
Chicago Sun-Times
Wikipedia
• Unsolved Mysteries


More photos for this case can be found on Synova’s Patreon page! Check them using the button below Synova’s Patreon Page

Synova’s Patreon

Support Synova’s Cause:

EACH WEEK SYNOVA HIGHLIGHTS OBSCURE COLD CASES ON HER BLOG AS A VICTIMS’ ADVOCATE WITH MISSOURI MISSING ORGANIZATION. SHE NEVER CHARGES FOR HER SERVICES. IF YOU’D LIKE TO SUPPORT HER IN THIS WORTHY CAUSE, PLEASE CHECK OUT THE AFFILIATE LINKS ON THIS PAGE. BY PURCHASING ONE OF HER BOOKS, OR USING THESE LINKS YOU WILL BE SUPPORTING SYNOVA’S WORK ON COLD CASES AND WILL ENSURE HER ABILITY TO CONTINUE TO GIVE A VOICE TO THE VICTIM’S FAMILY.


If you enjoy this content don’t forget to sign up for The Racketeer, Synova’s Weekly True Crime Newsletter. You will receive exclusive content directly in your inbox. As a gift for joining you will also receive the Grim Justice ebook free.

SIGN UP HERE


More About Our Wonderful Guest Blogger:

Ian Granstra is a writer and a native Iowan now living in  Arkansas.Growing up, he enjoyed watching real-life crime shows and further researching the stories featured. He wrote about many of them on his personal Facebook page, and several people suggested he should start a group featuring his writings. Ian founded the Facebook group “Murders, Missing People and More Mysteries” in August of 2018 he writes about many cold cases. The group also features many current criminal cases in the news. When Ian isn’t writing, he enjoys exercising, traveling and collecting sports cards. He’s also a big animal lover (his Facebook nickname is “beagle lover.”)


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