He Almost Got Away With Murder!

Guest Blogger’s FB True Crime Group: https://www.facebook.com/groups/631752367223887/


The Murder of Brenda Bowen He lived life on the run for four years and almost got away with murder! He stole the identities of homeless men and burnt the fingerprints off his fingers with acid trying to avoid the law.

Guest Blog Post: https://mytruecrimestories.com/2021/08/03/bowen-on-the-river-the-murder-of-brenda-bowen/


Vanished Without a Trace – Echo Michelle Lloyd

Echo Michelle Lloyd – Last seen May 10, 2020.

Echo Michelle Lloyd

Edwards, Benton County, Missouri

Last seen May 10, 2020.

Description: White female, brown hair, brown eyes, 5’4″, Weight: 100 to 110 lbs, 48 yo

She has a “Let it Be” tattoo with birds on her forearm. She also has the names of her four children, Kelsey, Kace, Kaitlyn, and Kylie, tattooed on her wrist.

Missouri Missing Persons Hotline at (866) 362-6422. 

missingpersons@mshp.dps.mo.gov


Echo Loyd disappeared a little over one year ago from Edwards, Benton County, Missouri, where she had resided for only a short seven months. Edwards is an extremely rural area and is surrounded by thousands of acres of forest and many waterways. Her adult daughter, Kelsey Smith, discovered she was missing from her home on May 15, 2020. She immediately informed the Benton County Sheriff’s Office. Kelsey describes her mother as good-hearted but a bit naive and non-confrontational.  

Kelsey last spoke with her Mother on May 9, 2020, the day before Mother’s Day. She drove to her mother’s house on Mother’s Day to visit and give her gifts, only to find Echo and her vehicle gone. She left flowers and a card on the porch, along with a note asking her to call. 

On Friday, May 15, 2020, Kelsey drove to her mother’s home. Her locked vehicle was there, but Echo was not. Kelsey searched around the property but couldn’t find her. The house was locked, so she entered through a window. 

Kelsey noticed that the house was more disheveled than her mother would generally keep it. There were small piles of trash here and there and moldy food in the kitchen. She searched Echo’s bedroom and noticed a pack of cigarettes and a lighter on the nightstand. She found her mother’s purse with her identification and cash. But her cell phones, keys, her pistol, and her medication were all missing. She also found a Wal-Mart receipt in the house, dated May 10, 2020, with Echo’s handwriting on it. And, someone had brought in the flowers and card from the porch.

Kelsey called the Benton County Sheriff’s Department. Eventually, the missing person’s case was sent to the Missouri State Highway Patrol.  

Some key information has surfaced since the investigation began, but much of it has left Echo’s family and the community with even more questions.

  • CCTV shows that Echo was at Wal-Mart in Warsaw, MO. 
  • A clerk at the Dollar General store, also in Warsaw, reports interacting with a woman who meets Echo’s description who was trying to buy a prepaid cell phone and phone card. According to the clerk, one or more people were waiting for the woman in a vehicle outside.  
  • Echo’s credit cards and iPhone have not been used since her disappearance. Her prescription medication has not been refilled. 
  • Her car keys and medication were eventually found, but not with her belongings at her house.
  • Echo’s pistol, which she always carried, was found in the woods in the area behind her home.

Law enforcement maintains there is an open investigation and has not made a public statement about the case. When trying to reach out to the Missouri State Highway Patrol, it took me two days to get through to the right person. He requested that anyone having information about Ms. Lloyd contact the Missouri Missing Persons Hotline at (866) 362-6422. 

There is a Facebook page, “Bring Echo Home,” and a website www.bringechohome.com dedicated to spreading the word about Echo, with the hope of finding someone who knows something about her disappearance. 


More About Our Wonderful Guest Blogger:

Synova Ink would like to welcome our newest guest blogger, Revonda Kirby. Kirby was raised among the State Line Mob and the Dixie Mafia. She is currently working on a book about her life.

Support Synova’s Cause:

EACH WEEK SYNOVA HIGHLIGHTS OBSCURE COLD CASES ON HER BLOG AS A VICTIMS’ ADVOCATE WITH MISSOURI MISSING ORGANIZATION. SHE NEVER CHARGES FOR HER SERVICES. IF YOU’D LIKE TO SUPPORT HER IN THIS WORTHY CAUSE, PLEASE CHECK OUT THE AFFILIATE LINKS ON THIS PAGE. BY PURCHASING ONE OF HER BOOKS, OR USING THESE LINKS YOU WILL BE SUPPORTING SYNOVA’S WORK ON COLD CASES AND WILL ENSURE HER ABILITY TO CONTINUE TO GIVE A VOICE TO THE VICTIM’S FAMILY.


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ALL INFORMATION USED TO CREATE THIS CONTENT IS A MATTER OF PUBLIC RECORD AND CAN BE EASILY FOUND ONLINE OR CAN BE VERIFIED BY THE GUEST BLOGGER. ANY PARTICIPATION OR ALLEGED INVOLVEMENT OF ANY PARTY MENTIONED WITHIN THIS SITE IS PURELY SPECULATION. AS THE LAW STATES, AN INDIVIDUAL IS INNOCENT UNTIL PROVEN GUILTY. I DO NOT OWN THE PHOTOS USED IN THIS POST. ALL PHOTOS ARE USED UNDER THE FAIR USE ACT. NO COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT INTENDED. ANY AND ALL OPINIONS ARE THAT OF THE GUEST BLOGGER AND DON’T NECESSARILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF SYNOVA INK©2017-2019. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


Intro to KC mafia with Gary Jenkins

Synova interviews ex-Kansas City Intelligence Officer, Gary Jenkins. Gary has produced 4 documentary films, created the Kansas City Mob Tour app, authored 3 books, and currently produces and produces and hosts his own true-crime podcast, titled Gangland Wire Crime Stories. In this popular true-crime podcast Gary Jenkins tells many stories about the Kansas City mafia, interviews experts on mafia families in many other cities, and has found many former mafia members to tell their stories.

Gary’s Podcast – Gangland Wire: https://ganglandwire.com/category/blog/ganglandcrimestories/

Gary’s books: https://amzn.to/3bnteDo

Bowen on the River – The Murder of Brenda Bowen

Photo courtesy of our guest blogger, Ian

When Jerry Bowen asked Brenda Breckenridge to marry him in 1976, she eagerly said yes. When he asked her for a divorce 19 years later, a despondent Brenda, knowing the marriage had disintegrated, again said yes.

Two years later, Jerry asked Brenda to take him back, but this time her answer was no. Four days later, Brenda disappeared. Two months later, her body was found floating in the Coosa River, a few miles from the couple’s rural Westover, Alabama, home, approximately 20 miles southeast of Birmingham.

Jerry Bowen was convicted of his wife’s murder, and everyone in the tiny central Alabama town thought that was the end to the saga. On the day he was to be sentenced, Jerry was a no-show in court. He went to extraordinary lengths to conceal his identity, but in the end, he could not outwit forensic science.

Most of Jerry and Brenda’s 19-year-marriage was happy. They had two teenage children, a son Jason and a daughter Jinjer. (Yes, that is how she spelled her name.) The couple was well-off financially; Jerry worked as a contractor and Brenda as a real estate agent.

By 1995, the 42-year-old Brenda knew the marriage was falling apart as the 48-year-old Jerry was having an affair with a younger woman. It was the quintessential midlife crisis, and Jerry decided to quit the marriage. He asked Brenda for a divorce; though saddened, she agreed. The proceedings were finalized just over a year later.

The marriage ending was amicable, and Jerry agreed to give most of the couple’s joint assets to Brenda. They were still on good terms, so much so that they decided o an unusual living arrangement: Brenda would live in the main house while Jerry lived in the smaller guest house on the former couple’s property.

For six months, the arrangement worked out well. But then Jerry realized the young woman he had taken up with might not have been attracted to him for his looks or charisma. Jerry wished he had not been so generous in the divorce settlement as he was in severe financial trouble.

Just as quickly as Jerry Bowen had squandered his marriage, his lover had wasted his money.

Brenda, conversely, had no financial trouble as her real estate business continued to thrive. In desperation, Jerry turned for help to the woman he had turned away.

On January 24, 1997, Jerry asked Brenda that they re-marry to give him some financial relief. Brenda told friends of the request; her decision is not known for sure, but it most likely was no.

Four days later, two of Brenda’s friends came to her home, having not heard from her and concerned that she had not attended her regular prayer meeting. Not finding her there, they called the police.

Shelby County Deputies found some of Brenda’s clothes neatly folded and lying on her bed, her jewelry lying neatly on her dresser, and her curling iron turned on in the bathroom.

That evening, police found Brenda’s car, stuck in the mud, 43 miles away. Inside were her purse, cell phone, and checkbook. Police were struck that the driver’s seat was pushed to the back. Brenda was only 5’2″ tall, and it would have been impossible for her to have reached the car’s pedals with the seat in that position.

At 6’1″ tall, Jerry Bowen would have had the seat in that position to drive.

When questioned by police, Jerry showed no concern for Brenda’s well-being and gave evasive answers to detectives’ questions. The interview took place in the early morning hours, and he fell asleep at one point.

Nothing, however, linked Jerry to Brenda’s disappearance, and he was released.

Two months later, on March 29, 1997, three fishermen saw a body floating in the Coosa River. The Shelby County Coroner identified the remains as those of Brenda Bowen.

Her body was too decomposed for the cause of death to be determined.

A green bed sheet with a nylon rope tied around it covered Brenda’s body. The bedsheet was confirmed as having come from her home.

The rope around the sheet was tied with two specific knots, a bowline and a slip. The ends of the rope were burnt. Bowen’s son Jason recognized the unusual knots as the pattern used by his dad.

In addition, Jason said when his dad cut a piece of nylon rope, he always burned the ends.

Jerry Bowen had no alibi for the day Brenda disappeared. He was arrested and charged with the murder of his ex-wife.

The case against him was entirely circumstantial but strong enough for the jury to convict him. To everyone’s surprise, the judge allowed Bowen bail for $150,000 as he awaited sentencing.

On the day of his sentencing, in March 2000, Bowen emailed a letter to his sister. It read, in part: “This may be a dumb move on my part, sis [sic], but I don’t feel I should serve time for a crime that I didn’t commit. Therefore, I’m running.” Police believed he had fled the area six days before his scheduled sentencing.

On April 28, 2000, Jerry Bowen was sentenced in absentia to life in prison.

A search of Bowen’s home found thousands of violent and sadistic pornographic images on his computer. Among the images found were those of women being tied up, shackled, and tortured. Bowen seemed to have a particular fascination with naked pregnant women.

The disturbing images found on the computer showed that Bowen had disgusting fetishes, but they failed to provide clues to his whereabouts.

Jerry Bowen stayed off the radar for over four years before the public exposure of his flight led to his capture.

The fugitive had been profiled on Unsolved Mysteries twice, America’s Most Wanted three times, and several other national crime shows.

Following the Unsolved Mysteries re-broadcast on December 22, 2004, a viewer from North Charleston, South Carolina, believed she recognized him. A man she knew as Steven Starbuck had been dating her sister on and off for the previous three years.

When police went to the man’s home, he produced a birth certificate and driver’s license identifying him as Steven Starbuck. He agreed to come to the police department for questioning.

The police, confident they had their man, were surprised when his fingerprints did not appear to match Bowen’s. Upon closer examination, however, a crime scene technician saw that although the tips of the fingers did not look alike, the ridges above the first crease on the fingers were a match.

More extensive fingerprint tests were conducted, confirming Steven Starbuck was Jerry Bowen. Bowen confessed his identity and told police he had purposefully poured acid on his hands to alter his fingerprints.

Bowen then told of his life-on-the-run: He initially fled to Reno, Nevada, where he lived for several years before briefly relocating to Salt Lake City, Utah. He worked in construction doing drywall in both cities before heading back east and settling in South Carolina.

Bowen also said he had been able to elude detection by befriending homeless people and assuming their identities; the real Stephen Starbuck was such a person and victim.

Jerry Bowen was sentenced to life in prison for the murder of his ex-wife Brenda. He was also convicted of identity theft.

In a 2010 interview for the show “I (Almost) Got Away with It,” Bowen again expressed his innocence in the murder of his wife. He said he fled because he was told police were going to kill him.

Several family members and friends support Bowen’s claims of innocence. No physical or forensic evidence linked him to Brenda’s murder; he was convicted entirely on circumstantial evidence.

Bowen’s children, however, are not among those who believe he is innocent.

Bowen became eligible for but was denied parole on December 1, 2019.

Now 73-years-old, Jerry Bowen is imprisoned at the Limestone Correctional Center in Harvest, Alabama.


THIS LIST OF LINKS IS NOT AN ALL-ENCOMPASSING SOURCE CITING. ALL OF THE INFORMATION USED IN THIS ARTICLE CAN BE EASILY FOUND ONLINE. LINKS BELOW WERE USED AS SOURCES AND ARE RECOMMENDED READING FOR SYNOVA’S READERS. SYNOVA STRIVES TO CITE ALL THE SOURCES USED DURING HER CASE STUDY, BUT OCCASIONALLY A SOURCE MAY BE MISSED BY MISTAKE. IT IS NOT INTENTIONAL, AND NO COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT IS INTENDED.

Further Reading:

Shelby County (Alabama) Reporter
Unsolved Mysteries


Join Our GUEST BLOGGER’S FACEBOOK GROUP here


More About Our Wonderful Guest Blogger:

Ian Granstra is a writer and a native Iowan now living in  Arkansas. Growing up, he enjoyed watching real-life crime shows and further researching the stories featured. He wrote about many of them on his personal Facebook page, and several people suggested he should start a group featuring his writings. Ian founded the Facebook group “Murders, Missing People and More Mysteries” in August of 2018 he writes about many cold cases. The group also features many current criminal cases in the news. When Ian isn’t writing, he enjoys exercising, traveling and collecting sports cards. He’s also a big animal lover (his Facebook nickname is “beagle lover.”)


Each week Synova & her team of guest bloggers highlight an obscure cold case. Synova works directly with the victims’ families to give them a voice and to generate leads for law enforcement. The potential viewership currently sits at 500,000!

Help Synova’s team reach a million people with these cold cases. Together we can solve some of these cases.

As a way of saying “Thank You” when you sign up for Synova’s true crime newsletter, you will get her Grim Justice eBook as a free gift! Please help us reach out to more people in our search for truth.

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Check out Synova’s new Podcast, Chasing Justice

Chasing Justice is on PodbeanStitchergoogle podcasts, itunes, and spotify. Listen on you favorite app! Look for the logo above. There is another Chasing Justice podcast out there.


Everything Wrong With the Jon Benet Case Part 1&2

Synova’s Chasing Justice Podcast: Award-winning crime writer, Synova Cantrell is joined by ex-Gambino Associate, Hootie Russo. Together they discuss the details of the JonBenet Case.

Part 1: Introduction Synova & Hootie lay out the basic timeline of events in this part of the series.

https://www.podbean.com/ew/pb-9nbhh-109b719

Part 2: Crime Scene Destroyed – Synova & Hootie lay out the basic timeline of events in this part of the series.

https://www.podbean.com/ew/pb-v8jg6-109b83d

JonBenetRamsey #chasingjusticepodcast #synovainkpublishing #hootiessocialclub

Everything Wrong with the Jon Benet case – Part 2 – Crime Scene Destroyed

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-v8jg6-109b83d

Synova’s Chasing Justice Podcast: Award-winning crime writer, Synova Cantrell is joined by ex-Gambino Associate, Hootie Russo. Together they discuss the details of the JonBenet Case.
 
Part 2: Crime Scene Destroyed –  Synova & Hootie lay out the basic timeline of events in this part of the series. Hold on, it’s going to be a long ride!
 

Sign up for the Racketeer Here:

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Follow Hootie’s Channel Here:

https://www.youtube.com/channel/UCtF9CGDw0zQQyjicH4sLPGA

 

Find more on Synova Here:

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Everything Wrong with the Jon Benet Case – Part one – Introduction

https://www.podbean.com/media/share/pb-9nbhh-109b719

Synova’s Chasing Justice Podcast: Award-winning crime writer, Synova Cantrell is joined by ex-Gambino Associate, Hootie Russo. Together they discuss the details of the JonBenet Case.
 
Part 1: Introduction Synova & Hootie lay out the basic timeline of events in this part of the series. Hold on, it’s going to be a long ride!

One of the Real Few – The Brutal Murder of a Marine named David Cox


January 5, 1994

In cinematic crime capers, when people are murdered, the killer is usually identified, captured, tried, and convicted within 2-3 hours. When people are murdered in real life, it does not work quite as quickly. Sometimes there is no conclusion to the case at all.

David Cox, a 27-year-old former United States Marine, was shot to death on a cold winter day near Boston in January of 1994. Over a quarter of a century later, his murder is a hard case as no one has been charged, and no suspects have been named.

When movie critics pan a picture, they often hear the ire of those involved in the production. Some believe David Cox paid a more morbid price, contending the murdered Marine was gunned down for giving a thumbs down to the Hollywood blockbuster “A Few Good Men.”

David Cox had always wanted to be a Marine. After graduating from high school in 1985, his dream came true.

After completing his basic training in Parris Island, South Carolina, David was stationed at the Guantanamo Bay Naval Base in Cuba.

In a letter dated June 30, 1986, PFC (Private First Class) William Alvarado, another marine stationed at Guantanamo Bay, wrote to his Senator, alleging marine misconduct at the base, specifically the illegal firing of weapons into Cuban territory.

David’s squad leader, Christopher Valdez, says the platoon commander gave his men an implied but not stated order to carry out a “hazing” against Alvarado. In military terminology, this is called a “Code Red.”

Approximately two weeks later, David and nine other marines entered Alvarado’s room while he was sleeping. For several minutes, the fellow marines hazed their cohort as they stuffed a rag into his mouth, blindfolded and pummeled him. David served as the hazing barber as he forcibly cut Alvarado’s hair.

After approximately five minutes with the shears, David’s expression turned to fear when he noticed Alvarado was no longer struggling or breathing. The hazing promptly ended, and the unconscious Alvarado was rushed off base to a Miami hospital. He recovered, and his fellow marines, including David, were condemned for the hazing.

The ten men were brought up on various charges.

Seven of the attackers accepted “other than honorable” discharges from the Marines. Of those, only Valdez succeeded in getting his discharge upgraded to honorable.

David and two other marines refused the Corps’ offer of a military plea bargain. They believed they had done nothing wrong and said they were following the orders of their superiors. They were willing to take their chances in a court, even though that meant the chance of a court-martial and a 20-year sentence at Leavenworth federal prison.

The “obedience to orders” defense had been tried without success in two major cases: by the defendants at the Nuremberg War Crimes Trials following World War II and by Lt. William Calley for the murder of native civilians in the My Lai Massacre during the Vietnam War. Adding to the difficulty was that the Colonel, who was said to have given the implied orders to attack Private Alvarado, denied he ever gave such an order, directly or implied.

At the end of the four-day court-martial hearing at Gitmo, however, David was convicted only of simple assault and sentenced to 30 days in jail. Because he had already served 38 days in the brig, the sentence was waived.

David completed his Marine career, serving out his final two years in North Carolina and overseas in South Korea and Panama. After he was honorably discharged from the Marine Corps with the rank of corporal in 1989, he moved into an apartment with his girlfriend, Elaine Tinsley, in Natick, Massachusetts, 20 miles southwest of Boston.

If you are a movie aficionado, the story of the hazing At Guantanamo Bay may sound familiar.

Playwright Aaron Sorkin learned of the incident from his sister Deborah, a member of the U.S. Navy Judge Advocate General’s Corps who represented some of the marines who accepted the plea deals.

Sorkin developed the saga into the play “A Few Good Men” in 1989. Following the play’s successful 14-month run on Broadway, he began to adapt it into a film.

In 1992, six years after the incident at Gitmo, the movie “A Few Good Men” was released. The legal drama was directed by Rob Reiner and starred in a slate of Hollywood heavyweights led by Tom Cruise, Demi Moore, Jack Nicholson, and Kevin Bacon.

“A Few Good Men” concerns the court-martial of two U.S. Marines charged with the murder of a fellow Marine and the tribulations of their lawyers in defending them. Like the Broadway play, the film was a hit, grossing over $140 million and garnering four Academy Award nominations, including that of Best Picture.

A few people, however, were not fans of “A Few Good Men.”

The film is set in Guantanamo Bay. The victim is PFC William Santiago, who, like the real-life PFC William Alvarado, wrote a letter to officials complaining of illegal firing into Cuban territory. As in the real-life court-martial, the key defense element was that the Marines followed implied orders from their superiors.

The marines involved in the hazing of Private Alvarado were angered that Hollywood was making millions of dollars telling a fictionalized version of the events, which painted them in a negative light. The movie had an accidental murder and dishonorable discharge for the two fictional Marines. In reality, no one died, and no one was dishonorably discharged.

David, in particular, was angered by the portrayal of him and his fellow marines as villains.

Following the release of “A Few Good Men,” David and five fellow former Marines, including Squad Leader Christopher Valdez, sued Castle Rock Entertainment, the movie production company that produced “A Few Good Men.”

The lawsuit, filed in federal district court, alleged, among other things: invasion of privacy, civil conspiracy, and intentional infliction of emotional distress. The Marines claimed the filmmakers “stole [their] real-life story, changed a few names, and passed it off as their own creation.”

David spoke about the lawsuit on radio talk shows and also spoke candidly and critically of United States Marines’ actions at Guantanamo Bay.

When David’s girlfriend Elaine returned home from work on January 5, 1994, she found the apartment empty.

David’s truck was still in the driveway, with the keys in the ignition. His un-cashed paycheck from his temporary job with UPS was on the dashboard, and his 9-millimeter gun was in the glove box.

After David had not returned home by evening, Elaine reported him as missing.

On April 2, three months later, David’s body was found by a canoeist in a wooded area on the banks of the Charles River in Medfield, approximately five miles from his apartment. He appeared to have been killed execution-style, having been shot four times, three times in his torso and once in the back of his neck. His cash and credit cards were still in his wallet, ruling out robbery as a motive.

Neither the murder scene nor David’s apartment showed any signs of a struggle. Police believe his murder was not a random attack and that he left his home willingly with someone he knew on January 4, the day he was last seen. This person is believed to have driven David to the remote locale where he and an unsuspecting David walked into the woods. Police believe at no point did David believe he was in any danger.

The location where David’s body was found was nearly a mile into the woods, which were a common hunting area in which the sound of gunshots would not have caused alarm.

David liked to gamble and owed thousands of dollars to several bookies. Police, however, do not believe his debts were large enough to be targeted for murder and have stated drugs were not a factor in his murder.

Many, including David’s military lawyer Donald Marcari, believe his murder is related to his lawsuit against Castle Rock Entertainment over the depiction of the marines in “A Few Good Men.” No evidence, however, has been found to support the theory.

David’s brother, Steve, however, has another theory.

David was hired as a driver for UPS for the 1993 Christmas season. As he had hoped, UPS was prepared to hire him permanently.

On April 2, the day he was last seen, his supervisor at UPS left two messages on his answering machine telling him they would hire him. Neither message had been played when Elaine came home that evening; it is not known if David heard either of them.

Steve Cox says a couple of months before his brother disappeared, he had told him that a supervisor and another driver were involved in some illegal activity, which he believed was theft. Steve believes David’s murder may be connected to the alleged shenanigans at UPS.

Similar to the military angle, however, investigators have found no proof to corroborate the belief that David’s death was related to UPS.

Twenty-seven years after he was found shot to death in the frigid Boston forest, David Cox’s murder remains unsolved.

If you have any information on the murder of David Cox, please contact the Massachusetts State Police 508-894-2584.


THIS LIST OF LINKS IS NOT AN ALL-ENCOMPASSING SOURCE CITING. ALL OF THE INFORMATION USED IN THIS ARTICLE CAN BE EASILY FOUND ONLINE. LINKS BELOW WERE USED AS SOURCES AND ARE RECOMMENDED READING FOR SYNOVA’S READERS. SYNOVA STRIVES TO CITE ALL THE SOURCES USED DURING HER CASE STUDY, BUT OCCASIONALLY A SOURCE MAY BE MISSED BY MISTAKE. IT IS NOT INTENTIONAL, AND NO COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT IS INTENDED.

Further Reading
Boston 25 News
• Unsolved Mysteries
• Weird History


Join Our GUEST BLOGGER’S FACEBOOK GROUP here


More About Our Wonderful Guest Blogger:

Ian Granstra is a writer and a native Iowan now living in  Arkansas. Growing up, he enjoyed watching real-life crime shows and further researching the stories featured. He wrote about many of them on his personal Facebook page, and several people suggested he should start a group featuring his writings. Ian founded the Facebook group “Murders, Missing People and More Mysteries” in August of 2018 he writes about many cold cases. The group also features many current criminal cases in the news. When Ian isn’t writing, he enjoys exercising, traveling and collecting sports cards. He’s also a big animal lover (his Facebook nickname is “beagle lover.”)


Each week Synova & her team of guest bloggers highlight an obscure cold case. Synova works directly with the victims’ families to give them a voice and to generate leads for law enforcement. The potential viewership currently sits at 500,000!

Help Synova’s team reach a million people with these cold cases. Together we can solve some of these cases.

As a way of saying “Thank You” when you sign up for Synova’s true crime newsletter, you will get her Grim Justice eBook as a free gift! Please help us reach out to more people in our search for truth.

SIGN UP HERE


Check out Synova’s new Podcast, Chasing Justice

Chasing Justice is on PodbeanStitchergoogle podcasts, itunes, and spotify. Listen on you favorite app! Look for the logo above. There is another Chasing Justice podcast out there.


Latest Interview on the MAFIA podcast

Check out my latest interview on the Mafia podcast.

It’s the early 1970’s in Biloxi, Mississippi. Kirksey Nix, one of the leading members of the Dixie Mafia, had been convicted of murder and began a life sentence without the possibility of parole. Despite this, Nix would continue heading up his gang from prison, orchestrate a hit on a local judge and his wife, and even target and scam gay men out of their money over the phone.


Preorder – Dawn of the Dixie Mafia book

From their birth place in Phenix City, Alabama to the corruption of today, the Dixie Mafia’s tentacles stretch from coast to coast throughout the south. While most of the world denies their existence, this network of freelance criminals have flown under the radar for the most part since the 1950s. Their structure is completely different than that of La Cosa Nostra so people discount them as rogue bands of individual criminals. In reality it’s one massive web of corruption, lies, and murder.

Check out Synova’s latest book called Dawn of the Dixie Mafia to find out how all of these random crimes fit together.