An Obvious Homicide – The Janice Wilhelm Story


A disabled woman incapable of lifting her arm is found dead from a gunshot wound to the neck. Somehow it is labeled a suicide even though she lacked the tendons and muscle tissue after having a tumor removed years earlier. The victim’s medical records and the subsequent autopsy report was reviewed by a renown forensic pathologist. After reviewing the records, he claims the death of Janice Wilhelm warrants further investigation. Janice Wilhelm could not have shot herself. Why won’t the authorities reopen the case then? Your guess is as good as mine. Read on to find out more about this startling case. 


December 8, 2010:

911 dispatch received a call from Gerald Willhelm of Centerville, Texas. The strangely calm husband reported his wife had shot herself. He claimed they were asleep in their recliners and at some point, she woke up and shot herself in the neck. Officer Grimes of the Leon County Sheriff’s Department arrived on-site twenty-two minutes later to find the first responders and strangely a county judge. 

The .45 caliber bullet traveled into the neck at a downward trajectory, passing through the lungs, and immediately severing the spinal cord through the 7th vertebrae. This would cause instant paralysis, so why do the crime scene photos show Mrs. Willhelm’s hands neatly tucked under her lap blanket? Where did the gun land? Six feet away the gun was laying on the floor pointing away from her chair. The spent casing landed behind the sofa.

If Janice was a physically capable woman, she would have to hold the gun upside down, press it to her neck with her elbow wrenched out above her head. This might be possible IF you omit one very important fact. Janice Willhelm had a tumor on her left arm the size of an orange removed. This surgery took much of her muscle tissue and damaged the nerves in her arm making it impossible for her to hold her arm above her chest, much less over her head. This is not merely conjectured on the part of grieving family members. This fact is corroborated by medical documentation. 

Gerald Willhelm claimed his wife was out of pain meds and killed herself because they couldn’t afford to get more. Crime scene photos show her medications were clearly sitting within arms reach of the deceased. To further dispel this accusation, UPS had recently billed the couple for their prescription delivery service. She was on disability and this covered most of her medications and she had worked out a co-pay deal with the drug companies for the remainder of the fees. Janice Willhelm was not out of pain medication and if anyone doubts this, they can refer to the toxicology reports that clearly show medications in her system at the time of death.

Below are two pictures of the crime scene. The only changes that were made to these photos are the addition of the blacked-out portions hiding the graphic details of the deceased’s wounds.


Notice the following:

  • The gun is laying 6 – 8 feet away from the deceased. If this had been a suicide, then the weapon would have fallen directly beside the chair, not six feet away in front of the couch.
  • The shell casing is found several feet away behind the couch. Again, this wouldn’t be the case in a suicide. The casing would have landed in the chair or amongst the blankets.
  • It has been reported that the blood under the recliner was already coagulated. Why? If this happened as Gerald claimed, then the police arrived 12 – 15 minutes later then there is no way that blood would be in such a state.
  • A gunshot residue test was done on Janice Wilhelm’s hands but was somehow lost in transit between the Dallas Medical Examiner’s office and the Leon County Sherriff’s office.

Blatant Lies:

Gerald claims in the 911 call that Jan killed herself because she was out of pain medication and they couldn’t afford more. This was proven false. The crime scene photos clearly showed Janice’s medication sitting on the table beside her chair, and the toxicology reports state she had pain meds in her system at the time of her death. Also, the children were able to prove that not only were Janice’s medicines mostly covered by Medicare, and the small remainder only amounted to a $5/month copayment.

The report states that Janice left a suicide note. It was later determined that the so-called note was nothing more than a diary of her symptoms and the medications she had taken. These standard nursing notes were what they claimed to be a suicide note.

Final Proof of Homicide:

July 2001:

Janice Wilhelm was admitted to the Baylor Richardson Medical Center surgery. A large tumor measuring 4″ x 4 3/4″ x 3″ was removed from the upper portion of her left arm leaving the muscular tissue and tendons severely damaged. This surgery saved her life but left her dominant arm nearly useless. Janice would no longer be able to lift her arm above her chest.

June 2015:

Vincent J.M. Di Maio, M.D. a forensic pathologist out of Dallas, reviewed Janice Wilhelm’s medical records and determined that it would be impossible for her to have committed suicide in such a manner. 

Aftermath & Motives Revealed:

The family waited for word of a will but were repeatedly told that Janice didn’t leave one. Then, suddenly within a couple of months of her death, Janice’s will was quietly pushed through probate court.

After fighting to get a copy of her mother’s will, Janice’s daughter was surprised at the supposed signature of her mother. It wasn’t even close to her mother’s signature, and yet there it was, and two people had witnessed it.

Finally, it was determined that both so-called witnesses had not seen Janice sign the documents at all. They were pre-signed before being presented for a witness signature. 

Why would anyone want seven acres of farmland in this area? Oil

Despite the will being a blatant forgery and the lawsuits pending, Gerald Wilhelm signed off, and the oil companies came in. An oil well and a gas well were fully functioning within a year of Janice Wilhelm’s death. The Clayton #1H well generated $400,000 worth of royalties within the first eight months of its existence. Can we say motive?

Cold Case did a segment on this case in 2010, and Gerald Wilhelm actually agreed to an interview but refused to let it be recorded because of the pending lawsuits. Strangely, he was dead within a week after the show aired. He supposedly died of a heart attack, but there was no autopsy, and he was cremated before anyone could request one.

I wish I could say that was the end, but there are a few more twists in this homicidal tale. I will leave you with one question.

Who owns that land and oil wells now?

I will give you a hint. It’s a toss-up between a blond banker, a ranch hand, and a false witness. Mix that with a possible extramarital affair, a vindictive family member, and big oil, and you will find the truth hiding in there somewhere. 


More Info:

911 Call

Crime Watch Daily Part 1

Crime Watch Daily Part 2

Crime Watch Daily Part 3

Synova’s Interview on Crime Wire


ALL INFORMATION USED TO CREATE THIS CONTENT IS A MATTER OF PUBLIC RECORD AND CAN BE EASILY FOUND ONLINE OR CAN BE VERIFIED BY THE GUEST BLOGGER. ANY PARTICIPATION OR ALLEGED INVOLVEMENT OF ANY PARTY MENTIONED WITHIN THIS SITE IS PURELY SPECULATION. AS THE LAW STATES, AN INDIVIDUAL IS INNOCENT UNTIL PROVEN GUILTY. I DO NOT OWN THE PHOTOS USED IN THIS POST. ALL PHOTOS ARE USED UNDER THE FAIR USE ACT. NO COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT INTENDED. ANY AND ALL OPINIONS ARE THAT OF THE GUEST BLOGGER AND DON’T NECESSARILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF SYNOVA INK©2017-2019. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.


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Shattered: behind every story is a shattered life

Every year Synova compiles the most popular blog post from the previous year into a case files book. In 2018, Synova Ink was filled with serial killer cases, cold cases, famous cases, and many obscure unsolved missing persons’ cases. Don’t miss this one. 

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Death by Hanging – Voluntary or Involuntary?


Mississippi Hangings

At 1:30 a.m. on August 22, 1992, Charles and Esther Quinn of Jackson, Mississippi, were awakened by a frantic phone call from Tanisha Love, the girlfriend of Esther’s 18-year-old son, Andre Jones. She told them the Jackson police had arrested Andre.

The following day, the Quinns received another phone call from the police, informing them that Andre had committed suicide while in jail.

The events that led to Andre’s arrest and death are still disputed. Police say it is an open-and-shut case of a depressed young man, fearful of going to prison, taking his life. Others contend Andre’s arrest was racially motivated, and his death was the result of police anger.

Civil rights leaders say the ordeal is a testament to a larger problem of racism in the Mississippi judicial system. They contend the death of Andre Jones shows that even as the 20th century was nearing its end, the 19th-century Jim Crow era was still operating in the Magnolia State.

Andre Jones’ mother, Esther Jones Quinn, was President of the Jackson branch of the National Association for the Advancement of Colored People (NAACP). His stepfather, Charles Quinn, was a Nation of Islam minister.

Many believe the police targeted Andre because of the powerful positions held by his parents.

Around 11:45 p.m. on August 21, Andre and his girlfriend, Tanisha Love, visited the Quinn’s home in Jackson for approximately 45 minutes. From there, Andre planned to drive Tanisha to her home in
Brandon, 14 miles east of Jackson. He had borrowed the truck he was driving from a friend.

At 1:00 a.m., on August 22, near the Brandon city limits, Andre and Tanisha were stopped at a police sobriety checkpoint. Police contend that just short of the checkpoint, Andre tossed something out of the window, which they found to be a.38 caliber handgun. Upon inspection of the truck, police say they found an open beer can. A license plate check revealed the truck license was stolen.

Tanisha’s version of the events differs from the police report. She insists that no gun was tossed out of the window and that no beer can was in the truck. She also says neither she nor Andre knew anything about the truck’s being stolen.

Police asked to see Andre’s license and insurance card, but he did not have them with him. Tanisha said when Andre told them his name, the policemen’s demeanor changed as they ordered Andre out of the truck, handcuffed, and arrested him.

Tanisha believes the white police officers arrested Andre because they knew who his parents were.

Andre’s friends and family are adamant that he was not and had never been a gang member.

At the police station, however, officers claim Andre admitted he was in a gang and showed them gang hand signals, which they said they photographed. Despite repeated requests from family members and the media, police have consistently refused to release the said photographs without explaining.

At approximately 2:00 a.m. on August 22, half-an-hour after Tanisha called the Quinns with the news of Andre’s arrest, Andre called his parents from the Brandon police station. He told them he did not know what he was being charged.

At 4:00 a.m. Andre called his parents again to say that he was being transferred to the Simpson County Jail in Mendenhall, 40 miles southwest of Jackson, still not knowing what the charges against him were.

Esther says she spoke with Andre three more times throughout the day. That afternoon, she finally learned the charges against her son: driving a truck whose vehicle identification number had been altered; carrying a concealed weapon; possession of stolen license plates and tags; and driving with an open container of alcohol in an automobile.

Fellow inmates say the police officers who booked Andre directed racial epithets against him. The officers, all of whom were white, deny making any derogatory statements.

When Esther called the Simpson County Jail shortly before midnight on August 22, she says she was casually informed that Andre had committed suicide in the jail’s shower. Authorities said Andre tied his shoelace to an iron grate above the showerhead and hanged himself.

Charles Quinn visited the scene where his stepson was found. Because he estimated the grate to be about eight feet above the floor, Charles believed Andre would have needed something to stand on and that he would have needed someone to hold him up. He also did not think a shoelace could have supported Andre’s body weight.

Dr. Steven Hayne, the state-appointed pathologist who performed Andre’s autopsy, said investigators demonstrated that Andre could have hanged himself unaided.

Dr. Hayne also contended that the manufacturer tested the shoelaces, and their tensile strength was determined sufficient to support Andre’s body weight.

The Quinns hired independent pathologist Dr. James Bryant of Chicago, to examine Andre’s remains. Dr. Bryant came to a different conclusion from Dr. Hayne, concluding it was “highly probable” that Andre had been strangled.

Dr. Bryant said in most suicide hangings, the ligature mark is along the side of the neck and does not go all the way around. In Andre’s case, the ligature marking went along the side of his neck, all the way to the back where it crisscrossed. For Dr. Bryant, this suggested someone had come from behind and wrapped the ligature around Andre’s neck.

Dr. Hayne disagreed, saying the knot imprint area would be in the hairline, which would act as a
buffer preventing the imprint from being present on the upper back surface of the neck. Dr. Bryant counters by saying that because Andre’s hair was short, the crisscross marking was not in the hairline, and no knot marks were found elsewhere.

The official autopsy report completed by Dr. Hayne listed no evidence of bruising on Andre’s neck or anywhere else on his body. However, Dr. Bryant’s autopsy found that Andre had sustained bruising under one of his eyes and on his shoulders. He says the bruising could have occurred at the time he died or could have been inflicted earlier that day.

Dr. Bryant believes Andre endured some sort of blunt force trauma during the time he was in jail. He concluded Andre was killed by someone who attempted to make his death look like a suicide.

However, Dr., Hayne’s ruling Andre’s death a suicide was supported by the Armed Forces Institute of Pathology, the U.S. Department of Justice, the U.S Attorney’s Office, the F.B.I., the Attorney General’s Office of the State of Mississippi and the state Medical Examiner of Mississippi.

Many people, particularly Civil Rights leaders, believe the death of Andre Jones was an example of incompetence, corruption, and perhaps racism in the Mississippi criminal justice system.

From 1988-93, at least 48 inmates, both black and white, died in Mississippi jails. Each death was by hanging, and all were ruled suicides.

In March of 1993, a coalition of Civil Rights groups conducted hearings in Jackson, Mississippi, regarding the jail deaths. Those testifying included the families of both black and white Mississippi inmates who had died under questionable circumstances.

Following the hearings, upon recommendation of the U.S. Commission on Civil Rights, the Justice Department opened a full investigation. Overseen by Attorney General Janet Reno, the Justice Department cited Mississippi’s jail system for what it called “gross deficiencies,” particularly unsanitary conditions and untrained employees. However, the report found no evidence that the hangings, including that of Andre Jones, were anything other than suicides.

In July of 1993, Andre’s parents filed two lawsuits: one against the state of Mississippi, charging wrongful death based on the intentional infliction of emotional distress; and the other against the federal government on the grounds that Andre’s civil rights had been violated. Both lawsuits were dismissed.

The death of Andre Jones and those of many other Mississippi inmates are still debated.

Civil rights leaders, as well as many other people, continue to believe the principles of the Jim Crow era, are still being followed by Mississippi authorities sworn to uphold the current laws. They believe the deaths of the inmates, including Andre Jones, were lynchings.


THIS LIST OF LINKS IS NOT AN ALL-ENCOMPASSING SOURCE CITING. ALL OF THE INFORMATION USED IN THIS ARTICLE CAN BE EASILY FOUND ONLINE. LINKS BELOW WERE USED AS SOURCES AND ARE RECOMMENDED READING FOR SYNOVA’S READERS. SYNOVA STRIVES TO CITE ALL THE SOURCES USED DURING HER CASE STUDY, BUT OCCASIONALLY A SOURCE MAY BE MISSED BY MISTAKE. IT IS NOT INTENTIONAL AND NO COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT IS INTENDED.

Further Reading:

• The Clarion-Ledger (Jackson, Mississippi)
New York Times
Unsolved Mysteries


More About Our Wonderful Guest Blogger:

Ian Granstra

Ian Granstra is a writer and a native Iowan now living in  Arkansas.Growing up, he enjoyed watching real-life crime shows and further researching the stories featured. He wrote about many of them on his personal Facebook page, and several people suggested he should start a group featuring his writings. Ian founded the Facebook group “Murders, Missing People and More Mysteries” in August of 2018 he writes about many cold cases. The group also features many current criminal cases in the news.When Ian isn’t writing, he enjoys exercising, traveling and collecting sports cards. He’s also a big animal lover (his Facebook nickname is “beagle lover.”)


This week’s Recommended Reading:


I’ll Be Gone in the Dark: One Woman’s Obsessive Search for the Golden State Killer


Exploding the Phone


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All information used to create this content is a matter of public record and can be easily found online or can be verified by the guest blogger. Any participation or alleged involvement of any party mentioned within this site is purely speculation. As the law states, an individual is innocent until PROVEN guilty. I do not own the photos used in this post. All photos are used under the fair use act. No copyright infringement intended. Any and all opinions are that of the guest blogger and don’t necessarily reflect the views of Synova Ink©2017-2019. All rights reserved.


If you’d like to check out Synova’s true crime books follow this link to her Amazon Author Page.

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Biography of an ex-gangster from Chicago
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The FBI’s Top 10 Art Crimes & More
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The tale of two judges; one just and the other a murderer
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Now you can own all of Synova’s Seriously Stupid Criminal Series in one box set

Click on the pictures to read more about each title and order your copy!


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52 Years Since Ronnie Anderson Was Slaughtered By the Dixie Mafia

Ashton Kutcher Look-Alike Slaughtered By Dixie Mafia

PHOTO COURTESY OF NEIMANLAB.ORG

It has been 52 years today since this disabled boy was used as a pawn in a sadistic game and then slaughtered.


Unlike his handsome Hollywood look-alike, Ronnie Anderson was tragic from the beginning. At the age of three, Polio ravaged his legs, leaving him dependent on leg braces to stand and move. He was a beautiful boy looking for love and acceptance but found it hard to find friends. While they were all outside playing, he would sit in the window and watch. This picture of him crying for fellowship with his peers still haunts his sister five decades later.

At the age of 17, Ronnie decided to move out of his father’s house and share expenses with an older boy. He got his first job working at McDonald’s, and it seemed as if life were about to begin for this lonely polio victim. If he could have only seen into the future a few months, he would have stayed home with his dad.

Unfortunately, the poor guy was in such need of approval; he became an easy target for malicious predators.

A phone rang at Sheriff Buford Pusser’s house in the early hours of August 12, 1967. It was a simple drunk and disorderly call, but his wife Pauline didn’t want him to go alone. Ever since Buford killed Louise Hathcock, he had been receiving threatening calls. One caller claimed, “the sheriff would be hunted down like a dog and shot.” An article in the Daily News would go into more detail about those threats. Unfortunately, by then, the slaughter had already begun.

Buford & Pauline Pusser drove out to the scene expecting a few drunks to be causing a ruckus. What waited for them in the shadows behind the church was more violent, and Pauline Pusser was the target. (This wouldn’t be known until recently when an anonymous witness came forward with information.) The sheriff had stepped over a line when he killed Hathcock and now Towhead White was going to avenge the death of his lover. White was in prison, but he had plenty of associates to handle the job. One such associate was Kirksey Nix, and another happened to be the roommate of Ronnie Anderson.

The original plan was to have “the little crippled boy” (or so he was referenced to by this witness) to knock on the door and lure Pauline out of the house. The crew of killers would take care of the rest. Of course, Ronnie had no way of knowing what would happen. The plan was changed when they saw Pauline get in the car with her husband.

Once the sheriff’s car passed the church, the murder-wagon pulled out behind them. (Some reports claim there were two dark-colored cars, and others claim there was one. I could not find definite proof of two cars although I have a pretty good idea what happened to that dark-green Cadillac a few weeks later.) As the car of thugs caught up to the sheriff, a passenger opened fire upon the Pussers with a .30 caliber automatic rifle.

Pauline was hit in the head and slumped down in the seat next to Buford. He ducked instinctively and slammed on the gas pedal. The car lurched forward, and he struggled to keep it between the ditches. The firing squad followed hard, but a couple of miles down the road it looked like the rugged sheriff had lost his tail. He was wrong. Buford had pulled over to check on his wife when the firing squad emerged out of the darkness and the onslaught of ammunition peppered the police car once again.

A bullet slammed into Buford’s jawbone, causing it to explode, and he slumped over in the seat. The mighty 6′ 6″ former wrestler was down for the count. Silence filled the pre-dawn air around the car. His attackers were gone. As mental clarity returned to the dying man, he mumbled a call for help into the police radio. Blinded by blood and fueled by rage, the sheriff drove himself to the nearby hospital, but it was too late for his beloved Pauline.

Life in McNairy County would never be the same.

Bloodlust was in the air, & revenge was coming.

Buford Pusser was wheeled into the emergency surgery. He would undergo a dozen of them over the next 18 days of torment. His detractors railed on him for missing his wife’s funeral, and they still do to this day. The original newspaper articles claim he was still in the hospital during the funeral. Buford Pusser was a roughneck, backwoods, in your face type of sheriff, but something changed within him during those weeks in the hospital. He went in a controversial lawman, but he came out looking for blood.

Can you blame the man for wanting to avenge the slaughter of his wife?

At first, Buford claimed to know his attackers and even named a few names, but by the end of his recovery, he had changed his story. Was the trama too much for him, or was he going to exact his own revenge outside the confines of the law? Lost in this cruel game of vigilante justice was the murder of the pawn.

Back at home in Gulfport, Mississippi, Ronnie Anderson had gotten an invitation to stay a few days with his older sister Phyllis. He was excited to go and desperately wanted to get away from the terrors of his roommate. He was last seen packing and ironing his clothes. Within an hour, he was dead.

Who killed the sweet Ashton Kutcher look-alike?

Dan Anderson got notified almost immediately after returning home from visiting Ronnie.

“Ronnie tried to kill himself.”

Dan rushed to the hospital only to be met in the waiting room by his ex-wife. (Rose also happened to be the roommate’s aunt.) She explained that Ronnie had died from a gunshot wound to the face. It didn’t make any sense. How could all of this happen within an hour or so?

Story #1:

Ronnie fought with his girlfriend Cathy, so he walked upstairs and shot himself in the face with a .410 shotgun.

Story #2:
Ronnie and his roommate had just returned from buying Ronnie some “deck shoes” when a friend stops by with two guns. The .410 was supposed to be missing a firing pin and was inoperable. Somehow this was a terrible mistake, and Ronnie’s death was from an accidental shooting.
Problems with both theories:

As you know, Ronnie was a polio victim in a bulky leg brace. This disease also left him with one leg quite a bit smaller than the other one. So, buying shoes was a complicated process. First, he had to purchase two separate pairs in different sizes, and then they had to be sent to his doctor to have them fitted with special plates to hook to his braces. There was no way Ronnie could wear so-called “deck shoes” in the first place.

Also, supposedly, Ronnie placed the gun between his feet and pulled the trigger to shoot himself in the face. With his reduced strength in his legs and feet and the brace, this would be impossible. Ronnie couldn’t hold anything between his feet.

Another strange issue:

Why didn’t anyone call the police? Instead, the roommate called his aunt, who washed Ronnie, got rid of the weapon and then took him to the hospital. Of course, the poor boy died in route. He never had a chance.

The night before the funeral, Phyllis was so distraught with grief her doctor prescribed sleeping pills to help her rest, but the nightmares continued. A once beautiful boy stood headless outside her bedroom window banging trying to get in. Phyllis tried desperately to pry open the glass, but it wouldn’t budge. This reoccurring dream would haunt her for years.

During her tormented slumber, a woman calls the house frantically asking to speak with Phyllis. Her husband refuses to wake her and ask to take a message. The woman refuses but finally, she breaks down and says her name is Cathy.

“They killed him. They killed him,” she gasps into the phone just before the line goes dead.

After the funeral, Phyllis took all her theories to law enforcement, but they refused to class the case as anything other than suicide. Her father, Dan Anderson worked as a deputy in the area and knew of the corruption, but found his hands tied. What was he to do? They had killed his son; now, his daughter was in their sights if he dared to fight it. Every time she called into the police department, Phyllis would receive a call from her dad immediately afterward.

“Leave it alone before you get someone else killed,” he demanded on one such call.

At this time no one, including Phyllis, had even heard of the Dixie Mafia. Fifty years later, a witness stepped forward, claiming to know the truth about Ronnie’s death. In reality, he was lured to the docks, beaten to death by a group of guys, and his roommate shot him in the face to stage a suicide.

When will his blood be avenged?

Last Monday we learned that the RICO Act wasn’t used on the Italian Mafia first. It was used against a Dixie Mafia kingpin out of Georgia in 1976. After much publicity, many hours of investigations, and the word of a few witnesses that have recently stepped forward, Phyllis is now hoping to use this great law to find justice for her brother.


The following links are for the benefit of Synova’s readers and are not an all-inclusive source listing.

Further Reading:

Daily Journal

Wikimapia

Synova’s Youtube Video


This Week’s Recommended Dixie Mafia Book:

Ghost Tales of The State Line Mob: Novel Based on Actual Events

Dixie Mafia Gangster: The Audacious Criminal Career of Willie Foster Sellers: A True-Crime Story

For those who like to read gritty crime novels, check out the latest from my friend and fellow writer, Wayne Clingman. 

Narco Saints


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ALL INFORMATION USED TO CREATE THIS CONTENT IS A MATTER OF PUBLIC RECORD AND CAN BE EASILY FOUND ONLINE OR CAN BE VERIFIED BY THE GUEST BLOGGER. ANY PARTICIPATION OR ALLEGED INVOLVEMENT OF ANY PARTY MENTIONED WITHIN THIS SITE IS PURELY SPECULATION. AS THE LAW STATES, AN INDIVIDUAL IS INNOCENT UNTIL PROVEN GUILTY. I DO NOT OWN THE PHOTOS USED IN THIS POST. ALL PHOTOS ARE USED UNDER THE FAIR USE ACT. NO COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT INTENDED. ANY AND ALL OPINIONS ARE THAT OF THE GUEST BLOGGER AND DON’T NECESSARILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF SYNOVA INK©2017-2019. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

If you’d like to check out Synova’s true crime books follow this link to her Amazon Author Page.

Synova’s Amazon Author Page

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Ashton Kutcher Look-Alike Slaughtered By Dixie Mafia

Deadly Secrets: The Death of A Father

D4E5C044-3733-42CE-BF29-F9A2DD6C73D9
 Photo courtesy of the Murdered In Mississippi Facebook Page

A gambling addiction got him mixed up in something too big to handle, but impossible to escape. He held his tongue after the ambush of Buford Pusser although his car may have been used without his knowledge. He kept their secrets despite them killing his crippled son, and he fought valiantly to keep his daughter safe. Now, it was time to pay the piper and Lt. Dan Anderson knew it. 


If you have been following my Mobster Monday posts, then you have heard the name Lt. Dan Anderson before. His story is interwoven throughout the entire series on the Dixie Mafia going all the way back to Buford Pusser up at the state line. By this point, it has been established that Anderson’s Cadillac was most likely the one used in the ambush of Buford Pusser and his wife on New Hope Rd. on August 12, 1967. Strangely, this car disappeared right after the death of Ronnie Anderson, Dan’s son.

For years, Phyllis, Dan’s daughter called the Gulfport police department begging them to look into her brother’s mysterious suicide case. They always refused to re-open the case and within minutes of her call to the police, Dan would call her and tell her to back off. This was the game for over thirty years until the fragile house of cards began to crumble one day in the fall of 2002. The sweet and sassy southern bell always visited her father over the holidays to celebrate his birthday. It was a tradition to go to the local waffle house and this year was no different. A chance encounter during this trip would bring down the house and culminate in the death of Dan Anderson.

During the meal, Phyllis noticed her father’s demeanor change drastically as he looked past her into the booth behind them.

“That Son of a $&%$%” he mumbled.

Startled, Phyllis started to turn and look but received a quiet rebuke from her father. A few minutes later the man strolled past the table glaring at Dan Anderson and his daughter. Dan waited a short while before speaking and then asked his daughter if she knew who the man was that just left the building? Of course, she had no idea.

“That’s the ol’ boy who killed Ronnie.”

Shocked, Phyllis sat watching her father as he visibly withdrew into a shell of a man. After 36 years her father had finally admitted what Phyllis had believed all along. She was shocked to find out that the killer was the roommate her brother had trusted and shared a house with. Dan Anderson had been constantly intimidated by the man for over three decades. What changed? Why would Dan finally drop such a bombshell? Was his son’s killer threatening to kill Phyllis too? We may never know.

After the holidays things began to escalate quickly. Late February or early March Dan’s attorney found a housekeeper to help around the house. He was always a tidy person who hated to have a cluttered space. A woman came to help out, but strangely never really cleaned anything. Aggravated by her, Dan called Phyllis and asked if she would come to throw out the housekeeper. Phyllis happened to have her leg in a cast all the way up to her hip but promised to come as soon as she could get it off. Unfortunately, it wouldn’t be soon enough.

A few days later, Phyllis speaks with the housekeeper and tells her to ship out because she would be coming to Mississippi soon. Within days she would travel back to Gulfport, but not to throw out a housekeeper. She would be attending to her father’s final affairs.

April 18, 2003, around midnight Phyllis would receive the call that would tear her heart out. Dan Anderson was dead from an apparent self-inflicted gunshot wound.

“Not again!” was all Phyllis could think.

The official story:

Dan Anderson, 80 had sent the housekeeper out to buy cigarettes because they were out. She found him when she returned dead at the end of the driveway. His pants were undone and he was in his sock feet. The subsequent autopsy was full of strange details and discrepancies and recently more information has come out leading us to wonder if the entire report was fabricated. We will wait until next week to dive into the conspiracy surrounding the death of Dan Anderson and why Phyllis believes her father was a victim of a gangland-style slaying. Stay tuned folks. This ride’s not over yet.


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THIS LIST OF LINKS IS NOT AN ALL-ENCOMPASSING SOURCE CITING. ALL OF THE INFORMATION USED IN THIS ARTICLE CAN BE EASILY FOUND ONLINE. THE SOURCE LINKS ARE PLACED WITHIN THE BODY OF THE TEXT.

This week’s Recommended Documentary:



Moonshine and the Dixie Mafia

This week’s Recommended Reading:



Wrath of the Dixie Mafia


All information used to create this content is a matter of public record and can be easily found online. Any participation or alleged involvement of any party mentioned within this site is purely speculation. As the law states, an individual is innocent until PROVEN guilty. I do not own the photos used in this post. All photos are used under the fair use act. No copyright infringement intended.©2017-2019. All rights reserved.


If you’d like to check out Synova’s true crime books follow this link to her Amazon Author Page.

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Retired Fireman Vanished in Texas

This week we have a guest post by blogger Giselle M. For those of you who don’t know, Synova suffered a serious injury and landed in the hospital. She appreciates all the support she has received during her recovery. Thank you, Giselle, for providing this story. 

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Retired Firefighter vanishes. Locals wonder if his wife’s affairs could have pushed him over the edge. Blood in the workshop proves otherwise. Where is Michael Chambers?

Michael Chambers, 70, disappeared in 2017 from his Hunt County home in Quinlan, about 40 miles east of Dallas. Deputies said they believe he may have been taken against his will after they found blood in his shop outside his home. A short time later they say he may have committed suicide.

Deputies say whatever happened to him most likely occurred between noon and 3 p.m. that Friday. His truck was at the house along with his keys and wallet. But police say Chambers and his cell phone and drivers’ license disappeared.

Chambers was last seen March 10 entering and then leaving the Quinlan Walmart alone. Surveillance video shows Chambers entering the store, paying for a couple of items, walking out to his truck and driving away.
Hunt County Sheriff Randy Meeks says Chambers and his family have been close friends for many years. He stated it his opinion Meeks committed suicide. The evidence shows a different story.

“I was his Sunday school teacher for several years,” the sheriff said. “I’ve never known a more devout Christian man than Michael Chambers. I trust him with my life.”

“This is absolutely unlike him. He’s not a person that just disappears,” said Cherri Hanes, Chambers’ daughter. “Someone knows something, and we plead and entreat you if that person is here, call the Hunt County Sheriff’s Department.”

The suicide theory states that this man with bad knees rode his bike twenty miles to a bridge on 9’ above the water and jumped off. No one has found the bike. No one can prove he had another bike besides the old one that still hangs in the garage.

Chambers is 6 feet 3 inches tall with balding gray hair. He has surgical scars on his right knee and both shoulders. He often wears a Dallas Fire & Rescue t-shirt. There is a $25,000 reward for specific information leading to his whereabouts.

The family has suspicions regarding his disappearance. A petition was started asking the Texas Rangers Company B to take over the investigation into the disappearance of Michael Chambers.

Simple Timeline:

– Mr. Chambers was last seen at Walmart in Quinlan at approximately 11:00 am.
– Neighbors came home around 3 PM and spent the entire afternoon working outside in the yard. (Noticed nothing unusual at the Chambers’ house)
– Later that evening Mrs. Chambers returns home to find her husband missing

Strangely, Mrs. Chambers left work around 2 PM, and her phone went off for over an hour after speaking to her boyfriend.
Some wonder if her husband found out about her affair and committed suicide. This is not the case. His wife’s infidelity was known to him for a long time.

Mrs. Chambers alleges to have arrived home from work and found her husband gone. His truck was parked at their house. The workshop on the property was found locked with Mr. Chambers’ keys, and wallet inside. Missing were his cell phone, and his Texas driver’s license. It is unconfirmed whether a small amount of cash was missing from his wallet. A large amount of money was still in the workshop, so robbery couldn’t be the motive.

Mrs. Chambers claims to have observed several “quarter” sized blood droplets on the floor of the workshop where he housed his classic cars. She stated to a family friend that she “thought it was transmission fluid.” (Samples of the blood were collected, and DNA analysis later confirmed that the blood belonged to Mr. Chambers. The Private Investigator claims there was a large amount of blood)

Mrs. Chambers called Suzy Losoya, daughter of Mr. Chambers, who told her to contact law enforcement. Mrs. Chambers called 911 at approximately 6:55 pm and reported to dispatch that she was unable to find Mr. Chambers at their home.

Mrs. Chambers then contacted a family friend, Penny Edwards, and asked her to come over to the residence because Mr. Chambers was missing. Mrs. Chambers called the Hunt County Sheriff’s Office at approximately 7:45 pm. Before police arrived, Mrs. Chambers told Ms. Edwards that she needs her to “be on my side.”

Hunt County Sheriff’s Office initially dispatched a single deputy. Two others joined him after it was apparent that Mr. Chambers was in fact missing. The deputies and neighbors searched the 10 acres of the Chambers property but did not find any trace of Mr. Chambers.

Mr. Chambers’ phone was last pinged near Lake Tawokoni shortly after he disappeared.

On Wednesday, March 15, 2017, the Hunt County Sheriff’s Office searched a five-acre area near the Chambers’ property. They had the help of more than 75 volunteers. Despite the search, investigators found zero evidence.

On or around March 20, 2017, Rebecca Chambers canceled/suspended the cell phone service for two of the lines on the Chambers’ family account with Verizon. She dropped the phone numbers and turned off the service that belonged to her husband’s phone, and her son’s phone, leaving only her phone service active.

Mrs. Chambers sold Mr. Chambers’ pickup truck soon after his disappearance. It is unknown if Mr. Chambers’ vehicle financing included a credit life option which would have paid off the truck in the event of his death. On June 28, 2017, the Texas Department of Transportation issued a new title on the 2014 Dodge Ram truck that had belonged to Mr. Chambers. Rather than the new owner’s name, the title listed “Michael Chambers Rebecca Lynn Chambers” as the vehicle owner. There was no lien holder listed on the new title.

According to the Will filed, Mrs. Chambers is the sole heir to Mr. Chambers’ property at this time. Per the proceedings, Mrs. Chambers is required to deposit 50% of any proceeds she receives as a result of all community property assets sold into an escrow account to be left untouched for at least three years. Any assets that are not community property, Mrs. Chambers is allowed to keep 100% of the proceeds. A Notice to Creditors on Mr. Chambers apparent death was published in area newspapers on June 26, 2017. Also, on June 26, 2017, the Hunt County District Clerk received an Inventory, Appraisement, and List of Claims from Mrs. Chambers. (Many items appear to be undervalued in this Appraisement compared to the current market values.)
Why was this allowed? Why would she hurry to have her husband declared deceased?

On June 8, 2017, Texas EquuSearch conducted a ground search in the area of the 7000 block of FM 2101 in Quinlan. Although the search was thorough, no sign of Michael Chambers was found.

Mrs. Chambers obtained a Protective Order against her son, Justin Chambers, through the Hunt County District Court system on July 13, 2017. The exact reason is unknown. The Protective Order is in place for the next two years.

During a birthday party celebration on June 27th, Mrs. Chambers was at the home of family friend, Penny Edwards. She stated to Ms. Edwards that Mr. Chambers “was not coming back.” Ms. Edwards claims that Becca Chambers was stoic and adamant about her statement.

A red 1966 Mustang red convertible was sold to an out of state buyer on July 7, 2017. Mr. Chambers had given it to his wife as a gift at the end of 2016. The vehicle was in the name of a Chambers family member.

Mrs. Chambers expressed financial hardship soon after Michael’s disappearance. After a family discussion, it was decided that Mrs. Chambers would sell the 1966 Mustang. The other alternative was for Mrs. Chambers to file for a Death Certificate through the court system, and probate Mr. Chambers’ Will.

The family was made aware of the Death Certificate filing when Suzy Losoya, Mr. Chambers’ daughter, received a call from one of his former Dallas Fire Department coworkers asking about Chambers being deceased. When the Death Certificate was filed, the Dallas Fire Department pension board was notified. Until that time, the family had no idea that Mrs. Chambers had filed for the Death Certificate. They were under the impression that selling the Mustang was the route that she was going to take.

In the days previous to July 14, 2017, a local resident, Bradley Marion Dunn, made claims on social media that he had information on the Chambers’ case. Chambers family members spoke with Mr. Dunn during this time. He was encouraged to contact the Hunt County Sheriff’s Office.

On July 14th, Bradley Dunn met with deputies from the Hunt County Sheriff’s Office at a location near the intersection of Farm to Market Road 2101 and Rancho Road in Quinlan. Mr. Dunn, a career criminal, was said to be jittery and under the influence of some mind-altering substance. Mr. Dunn was arrested on scene by Hunt County Sheriff’s Office for having a handgun on his person. He was booked into the Hunt County Detention Center. He was also charged with a Motion to Revoke Probation. Mr. Dunn is currently in the custody of the Hunt County Detention Center, awaiting disposition of his charges.

The afternoon of August 25, 2017, law enforcement retrieved swabs from the floor of Mr. Chambers’ shop for control sample analysis processing at an independent lab. The results have not yet come back.

A realtor was observed taking photographs of the Chambers home on August 26th. The house is presumed to be on the market for sale.

Several searches for Mr. Chambers have been held since his disappearance. The Texas Department of Public Safety conducted an aerial helicopter search of the Chambers property and surrounding areas. Also, dogs were brought in from the Texas Department of Criminal Justice in Bonham. The dogs picked up Mr. Chambers’ scent, and trailed it to the roadway, but were unable to follow it any farther. Also, a sonar search was used on the pond across the road from the Chambers house, and even at Lake Tawakoni by TEQ.

At least two male subjects who acquaintances of Mrs. Chambers have been questioned by area law enforcement.

The Hunt County Sheriff’s Office has only responded to phone calls or emails from Mr. Chambers’ family sparingly. Despite numerous inquiries by family members, the Hunt County Sheriff’s Office has failed to request the iMessages for Mr. Chambers’ phone account from Apple. The call logs were previously given to HCSO by the family soon after Chambers’ disappearance. HCSO is refusing to deem the case as criminal, saying that no criminal acts have been committed. A private investigator was hired by the Chambers children soon after he went missing.

This retired fireman needs justice. It is unfathomable that this man was injured in his garage, then found a bike that no one can verify he owned and ride the grueling 20 miles to the bridge to commit suicide. He knew about his wife’s affairs, and there’s documented proof of it. What happened to Michael Chambers?

If you have any informtion about this case please contact the Hunt County Sheriff’s Department at 903-453-6800.

Further Information:

Reddit

Interview with P.I.

All information used to create this content is a matter of public record and can be easily found online. Any participation, or alleged involvement of any party mentioned within this site is purely speculation. As the law states an individual is Innocent until PROVEN guilty. ©2017-2019. All rights reserved.

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Snatched: The FBI’s Top Ten Art Crimes and more (Synova’s Case Files)

Black Gold Runs Blood Red In Texas: Part 3

 

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For those of you who haven’t been keeping up with the series, here is a quick rundown. The family patriarch, Morris Robeson is found dead from a single gunshot wound to the back of the head. (Date of Death: 11/20/2000) Oil will be discovered on Morris’ property in the future. Who will cash in? That will depend on who survives.

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Morris’ neighbor is a highway patrol officer who stopped by the crime scene. Joe Weaver was off-duty and told the family the other officers were surprised to see him. He immediately noticed the scene wasn’t being handled as a homicide, but rather a suicide. Weaver was suspicious and began his own separate investigation.

Morris and his wife Mable had raised their grandson, Wayne Robeson as their own and would treat him as their third child. Weaver spoke with Wayne and wanted to know the whereabouts of one Gerald Willhelm. Gerald has a strange story to tell, but his story will be coming later.

Morris Robeson was a veteran of WWII and had been struggling with neck and upper back pain associated with degenerative disks in his spine. This had reached the point to where he was no longer able to trim his own hair with an ear/nose trimmer. This trimmer was weighed recently to give the reader a reference point. The trimmer weighed less than 2 ounces. Yet, despite the V.A. records to prove Morris Robeson’s disability, the authorities continue to label this case a suicide. To further plant doubt in your mind, the gun used to kill Robeson was a .38 Colt revolver with a 6-inch barrel. This weapon was weighed as well. Its weight was just under 1lb.

If a man cannot lift 2 ounces, how can he lift a 1lb-object, twist it up behind his head, and pull the trigger?

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After the death of his neighbor, Joe Weaver continues his investigation over the course of several months, but his truth-seeking venture was cut short late in September 2001. If the Morris Robeson case wasn’t strange enough, here are the facts of the alleged suicide of Joseph Weaver.

On the day before his death, Joe’s wife picked up her daughter and their son from school. Joe’s step-daughter reported to her guidance counselor that Joe had molested her. (There has never been any proof of this claim, and it seems to just come out of the blue.) The wife tells her son to call Joe and ask him to leave the barn and go into the house. Yes, this is what it states in the report. Why was he in the barn? Why were these allegations brought up just now? Why was Joe’s young son the one who had to call his dad and tell him to leave the barn? Could Joe not decide to walk to the house on his own?

Why was he “holed-up” in his barn in the first place?

If that wasn’t unusual enough, the wife then calls Sherriff Price to go to the house and check on Joe. Price states he arrives just in time to see Joe Weaver walk slowly out of his barn and toward the house. He supposedly stopped before getting to the house, pulled out his service revolver, and killed himself. To this day the authorities have denied all FOIA requests stating there wasn’t a police report written. No crime scene photos were taken.

This is proven false, however, when an anonymous witness sends a picture of the first page of the police report on Joe Weaver’s death to the family.

Why did Joe Weaver want to talk to Gerald Wilhelm? Why would all of this occur just a few years before the big oil boom in Centerville, Texas? Who has the farm now? How would Wilhelm con his way into the Robeson family? Why would his father-in-law be killed less than a year later? Hold on, guys. Chaos has settled down upon the Robeson farm like a tornado.

 

Black Gold Runs Blood Red in Texas: Part 1

 

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Janice Willhelm

One suspicious suicide in a small town may not be unusual, but five deaths within a square mile of each other? Within a year an oil boom hits Centerville, Texas and the deaths are all swept under the rug. While a hand full of people get rich, the family members of the murder victims are left with nothing but questions. Usually, when someone writes a story they start at the beginning of the tale. This bloody tale starts in the middle and expands exponentially in every direction. This case will take a few weeks to tell, so hold on for this Texas-sized tale of murder, forged wills, and oil wells.

December 8, 2010:

911 dispatch receives a call from Gerald Willhelm of Centerville, Texas. A strangely calm husband reports that he believes his wife has shot herself and that blood is pouring from her neck. One article states a distraught husband calls 911. I have listened to the call and he does not sound upset at all. He says they were asleep in their recliners and at some point, she woke up and shot herself in the neck. The authorities arrive and quickly rule the death as a suicide. Case closed. Investigation complete. Not really.

 

The .45 caliber bullet traveled into the neck at a downward trajectory, passing through the lungs, and immediately severing the spinal cord through the 7th vertebrae. This would cause instant paralysis, so why do the crime scene photos show Mrs. Willhelm’s hands neatly tucked under her lap blanket? Where did the gun land? Six feet away the gun was laying on the floor pointing away from her chair. The spent casing landed behind the sofa.

 

If Janice was a physically capable woman, she would have to hold the gun upside down, press it to her neck with her elbow wrenched out above her head. This might be possible IF you omit one very important fact. Janice Willhelm had a tumor on her left arm the size of an orange removed. This surgery took much of her muscle tissue and damaged the nerves in her arm making it impossible for her to hold her arm above her chest, much less over her head. This is not conjectured on the part of grieving family members. This fact is corroborated by medical documentation. Janice could not have held that gun. Her daughter claims that Janice had a life-long fear of guns and wouldn’t be holding one at all.

 

Gerald Willhelm claims his wife was out of pain meds and killed herself because they couldn’t afford to get more. Crime scene photos show her medications are clearly sitting within arms reach of the deceased. To further dispel this accusation, UPS had recently billed the couple for their prescription delivery service. She was on disability and this covered most of her medications and she had worked out a co-pay deal with the drug companies for the remainder of the fees. Janice Willhelm was not out of pain medication and if anyone doubts this, they can refer to the toxicology reports that clearly shows medications in her system at the time of death.

 

Black Gold:

Almost immediately after his wife’s murder, Gerald Willhelm quickly pushes his wife’s will through probate and quickly leases his wife’s land to a large oil company for drilling. Reports state the royalties of this well accounted for nearly half a million dollars within the first eight months. Strange, but not necessary a crime, right? Wrong!

Janice had two children; a daughter, and a son. Both children had been suddenly written out of their mother’s will several months before her death. After fighting to get a copy of this will, the kids were surprised to see their mother’s name. It was nothing like her signature. A child could see the differences. They send this document and several handwriting samples to two different specialists. Both adamantly claim this will to be a forgery. Not only do they claim Janice did not sign this document, they say the handwriting looks like Gerald’s.

 

If that isn’t enough to make you wonder about this case, then next week I will jump into the suspicious death of Janice’s father and the money Gerald conned from his first wife before she died. See you next week. In the meantime, I will be wading neck deep in this case of greedy oil men and corrupt officials.

 

Silenced by the Dixie Mafia – Part 2: Crippled Innocence – Murder of Ronnie Anderson

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Six weeks after the ambush of Sherriff Pusser and his wife on New Hope Rd another death was reported to police in Gulfport, Mississippi. 17-yr-old Ronald Anderson was said to have committed suicide in an apartment he shared with the teenager, Jeffery D. Bass. Anderson’s body was transported to the Lang Funeral Home in Gulfport, then transferred to Faith Chapel in Pensacola, before being taken to Vernon, Florida for burial. No Autopsy was performed, and no one in law enforcement questioned the suicide ruling by local coroner Frank Hightower. This life-shattering event for the family barely caused a stir amongst the locals and only generated one small article about the death inquest. No one seemed to care that this crippled teenager could have been gunned down. It was more convenient to label it suicide and go on.

What I’m about to relate is highly controversial. I have researched and studied this case trying to provide evidence. I have uncovered some compelling facts and some disturbing theories. In the 25-page Sherriff’s Investigation report into this case, I have discovered a few more tidbits of questionable behavior by law enforcement. I have struggled to remain unemotional in this case, but I will try to relate the story to you with logic and reason. I will let you decide what happened to Ronald Anderson for yourself.

Before getting into the case, I must explain to you that I was raised with extreme respect for law enforcement. As far as I’m concerned anyone who is willing to put their life on the line to protect someone else is a hero in my book. I am currently running a Blue Lives Matter too campaign with my events. So, when I mention something derogatory in this article, please don’t think I’m attributing the actions of a few shady officials to the entire law enforcement community. I bleed blue for our guys and gals in uniform and don’t wish anyone to think otherwise. Like every position in any organization, there are a few shady characters, but that doesn’t mean the entire system is corrupt.

Ronald “Ronnie” Anderson had a rough life from the start. He contracted Polio at the age of three and would have to wear a leg brace for the entirety of his life. One leg was smaller than the other, so buying shoes was a difficult task. He would need two different sizes, and one shoe must be mounted onto his braces. Ronnie was a beautiful, sweet child with large brown eyes. His sister remembers how he would cry when his friends would go play and leave him behind. He wanted so desperately to fit in, and family members think that’s what led to his death.

September 26, 1967:

Ronnie had gotten a job working at McDonald’s and decided to move out of his father’s house with an older boy named Jeffery Bass. He was so excited to be starting out on his own and had even gotten a little “friend” named Cathy. Ronnie finally felt like he belonged, but this wouldn’t last. Two months after moving out he started having trouble with Bass. Bass was older and rowdy and is rumored to run with a shady crowd. On this morning, Ronnie’s sister Phyllis offered to let him come to visit her for a while. Ronnie was excited to go. His parents had divorced when he was quite young. Phyllis had practically been a segregate mother while their own mother was working trying to provide for four children.

Ronnie’s father, Lt. Dan Anderson went to see the teenager that morning and to take him some new shoes. The teenager was busy packing some clothes and ironing his shirt. His sister would arrive from Pensacola, Florida in a few hours and he wanted to be ready. Dan Anderson returned home only to receive a phone call within the hour. Ronnie was dead.

The distraught father raced to the hospital only to be met by his ex-wife Rose Moore. Rose was also Jeffery Bass’ aunt. Instead of calling the ambulance, Jeff had called his aunt since she was supposedly a registered nurse. Rose cleaned up Ronnie and changed his clothes before calling the ambulance. Why? No one could give an answer to that question.

So, what happened to Ronnie?

Bass told the police that he was sitting on the bed playing with a .410 shotgun and it accidentally went off shooting him under the chin. According to Bass, it was a shock because they thought the gun didn’t have a firing pin. Could Ronnie have been toying with the weapon thinking it was inoperable and accidentally shot himself? If so, why would the aunt come racing in and wash the teenager and change his clothes?

If that wasn’t unusual enough to cause investigators to question this case, the other witness had a different story to tell. Cathy claimed that she and Ronnie had argued and then he went upstairs and shot himself. That’s what she told the police, but that’s not what she said in her frantic phone call to Phyllis the night before Ronnie was buried.

The inconsolable sister had been given sleeping pills by her doctor and had turned in for the night. The phone rang with a frantic woman insisting on talking to Phyllis. Her husband assured the woman that Phyllis was out cold and couldn’t come to the phone and asked to take a message.

“He killed him. We killed him,” was all Cathy said before disconnecting.

Phyllis took all these discrepancies to the police and tried to get her brother’s case re-classified, but she couldn’t find anyone who would help her. Every time she decided to call and ask questions she would receive a call from her father telling her to let it alone. Phyllis couldn’t leave it alone and wondered how her father could. She didn’t realize the trouble she was causing by asking questions. Phyllis was an innocent sister grieving the loss of her precious crippled little brother. So she kept digging.

More discrepancies:

The funeral director for Faith Chapel Home in Pensacola was friends with Ronnie’s stepdad and mother.  This gentleman confided in the family saying he didn’t think it was suicide because there wasn’t any gunshot residue around the wound. Could that just be because Rose washed him, or could it mean that he was shot from a distance by someone else?

Rumors say that Ronnie’s relationship with Cathy was one-sided. If this is true, could Cathy’s real boyfriend have shot Ronnie?

The local coroner has come under some scrutiny after many claims he rules cases as suicide too quickly and too often. Some locals even referred to him as “Suicide Hightower.” After researching, I couldn’t find any official charges brought against the coroner. Could they be just rumors, or could those stories be based in facts? Who knows?

Little did Phyllis know that some of her local law enforcement officials and government officials were arm and arm with the Dixie Mafia. This wouldn’t come out publicly for decades. Did Ronnie hear something he shouldn’t have? Could Bass and his friends have silenced the boy forever?

Phyllis continued to press the police department for answers until one day her father called.

“Leave it alone before you get someone else killed,” he demanded.

Shocked, Phyllis backed off and tried to investigate a little more quietly. This inner turmoil wondering what happened to her brother and why her father wasn’t pushing the issue continued for 36 long years.

It was November 2002, and Phyllis always came into town to visit her father to celebrate Thanksgiving and her father’s birthday. The two went to the local Waffle House as usual. During their meal, Dan Anderson’s entire persona changed, and he mumbled “That Son of a $&*&^” under his breath. Surprised, Phyllis turned to see who he was referring to only to be reprimanded by her father.

Dan waited until the man was out the door and his car pulled out onto the road before he said anything else to his daughter.

“Do you know who that was?”

“No, but I can tell you don’t like him Daddy.”

“That’s the old boy who killed Ronnie.”

Phyllis about fell out of her chair. For thirty-six years her father had reprimanded her for saying the very same thing. He claimed his son’s death as suicide for nearly four decades, and now he just pointed out the man who killed his son. Of course, Phyllis had questions, but her father clammed up about the subject and wouldn’t speak another word of it.

After her father went out to his car, Phyllis hung back and talked to the waitress that knew all the local gossip. That’s when she was given the name Jeffery Bass. Unfortunately, years later during the Sherriff’s investigation this waitress and the other surviving witnesses would change their stories or conveniently forget it entirely. Were they intimidated into silence or did they really forget?

Sadly, Lt. Dan Anderson would be dead a short time after pointing out his son’s killer. Surely the police would stand up and take notice. Nope. I’ll get into that and the revelation of the Dixie Mafia in the famous case of Judge Sherry’s murder. Can all these cases be linked by an unlikely string of coincidences or are they tied together by the Dixie Mafia? I will leave it up to you to decide.

You can listen to Phyllis’ interview on Stitcher’s Crime & Scandal podcast here:

https://www.stitcher.com/podcast/levi-page/the-haleigh-cummings-mystery/e/52987090