Remnants Of A Tortured Life

C:\Users\CLIENT\Pictures\1.jpg
Photos courtesy of Guest Blogger



As a telephone company laborer went to work on the morning of October 4, 1978, little did he know he would make a discovery that would instigate one of Iowa’s most wrenching mysteries?

The worker was laying cable along Highway 182 in rural Lyon County, near Rock Rapids in the far northwest corner of the Hawkeye state. In the course of his work, he found more than a few dead lines. He found one dead human. The skeletal remains of a half-naked woman lay in a ditch along the north side of a gravel road approximately one mile from the Rock Rapids school. The remains were too decomposed to identify.

The remains found near Rock Rapids remained unidentified for over 27 years until, January of 2006 when a Des Moines lab technician matched the woman’s left thumbprint to one sent to various labs from Los Angeles, California. The woman in the ditch finally had a name; Wilma June Nissen. Sadly, she had suffered a rough life.

Wilma was born in San Francisco, California, in 1954. Her younger sister, Mona, was deaf and unable to speak. Wilma’s mother abandoned her children when she was eight, and her father abused his daughters. While he was at work, Wilma and Mona were locked in a closet. After he was fired from his job, the young girls moved from the closet to the car, where Mona was confined for most of the day while Wilma was dispatched to the streets to scour for food. Wilma never attended school and could neither read nor write.

C:\Users\CLIENT\Pictures\1.jpg

In 1964, after the state of California removed the Nissen children from their father’s “care,” they spent the remainder of their youth bouncing around foster homes. Perhaps predictably, as she became a young adult, the uneducated and desperate Wilma resorted to prostitution.

Wilma married three times and had two children. In February of 1978, the 23-year-old went to Atlanta, Georgia, with 54-year-old Charles Belt, the last known person to have seen her alive, eight months before her remains were found in Lyon County, Iowa. I could not find a picture of him.

C:\Users\CLIENT\Pictures\1.jpg

Investigators believe Wilma was placed in the Lyon County ditch in either July or August of 1978, 5-6 months before her remains were discovered. She was naked from the waist up, and her feet were tied together with a braided hemp rope. The cause of death could not be determined, but it had been horrendous. All but two of her teeth had been pulled. The rest of her teeth, along with her lower jawbone, her other clothing, and belongings, were never found.

C:\Users\CLIENT\Pictures\1.jpg

In August of 2009, a suspect emerged in the death of Wilma Nissen when 82-year-old John Van Gammeren was charged with six counts of perjury after lying to detectives about transporting strippers and prostitutes from Sioux Falls, South Dakota, across the Iowa border to his home in Inwood. The ditch where Wilma was found was not far from Inwood. However, the charges against VaGammeren were later dismissed.

C:\Users\CLIENT\Pictures\1.jpg

Seven years later, in 2016, investigators announced they believed they knew one of the people who killed Wilma Nissen.

Authorities believe that after leaving Atlanta, Georgia, sometime between February and July of 1978, Wilma made her way to northwest Iowa after connecting with an escort service based in Sioux Falls, South Dakota. Police say the woman pictured below was a prostitute and escort for the same company as Wilma during the mid-1970s when the photo was taken. Lyon County investigators believe she is one of the people who murdered Wilma Nissen. Police say they have conducted several interviews with her, but she has steadfastly denied any involvement in Wilma’s death. They know her true identity and where she is currently living but have not yet divulged that information.

In the summer of 1978, investigators say several Lyon County residents attended sex parties in the western part of the county, near the South Dakota border. Both Wilma and this woman worked as dancers, escorts, and prostitutes at these parties. Police believe Wilma was killed at one of the parties and that robbery was the motive, as the woman pictured below frequently stole from other prostitutes, escorts and dancers.

Authorities say they need someone to independently identify this woman; so far, no one has done so.

Another prostitute, known only by her stage name of “Peaches,” is also believed to have participated in Wilma’s murder. Authorities do not have a picture of her but say she is a light complected black female from Thunder Bay, Ontario, Canada, who was in her mid-to-late ’20s in the late 1970s.

C:\Users\CLIENT\Pictures\1.jpg

Investigators would like to speak to Donald Wellington, one of Wilma’s former husbands. It is emphasized that he is not a suspect in Wilma’s murder and is only being sought for questioning. Authorities believe he may be living in the Palmdale, California, area. The below photo was taken in 2000.

Image may contain: 1 person, possible text that says 'DONALD WELLINGTON'

Wilma Nissen’s short and tortured life ended with her brutal death in an area to which she had no connection– rural northwest Iowa. Lyon County, nevertheless, considers the woman who had no name for over a quarter of a century as “Our Girl.” Wilma June Nissen is buried in Rock Rapids’ Riverview Cemetery.

By investigators’ own admission, a little luck led to learning Wilma’s identity. Perhaps luck will one day make a curtain call and lead to her killer’s identity.

Image may contain: outdoor

A $10,000 reward is offered for information leading to an arrest and conviction of the person or persons responsible for Wilma Nissen’s death. If you have any such information, please contact one of the people below:

• Detective Jerry Birkey, Lyon County Sheriff’s Office, (712) 472-8300
• Special Agent J.R. Mathis, Iowa Division of Criminal Investigation, (712) 252-0507
• Special Agent Jon Moeller, F.B.I., (712) 258-1920


C:\Users\CLIENT\Pictures\1.jpg

SOURCES:
• ABC Affiliate KSFY TV
• CBS Affiliate KELO TV
• Iowa Cold Cases
• Lyon County, Iowa Sheriff’s Office
• Northwest Iowa Review
• Sioux City Journal 


THIS LIST OF LINKS IS NOT AN ALL-ENCOMPASSING SOURCE CITING. ALL OF THE INFORMATION USED IN THIS ARTICLE CAN BE EASILY FOUND ONLINE. LINKS BELOW WERE USED AS SOURCES AND ARE RECOMMENDED READING FOR SYNOVA’S READERS. SYNOVA STRIVES TO CITE ALL THE SOURCES USED DURING HER CASE STUDY, BUT OCCASIONALLY A SOURCE MAY BE MISSED BY MISTAKE. IT IS NOT INTENTIONAL, AND NO COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT IS INTENDED.


More About Our Wonderful Guest Blogger:

Ian Granstra is a writer and a native Iowan now living in  Arkansas.Growing up, he enjoyed watching real-life crime shows and further researching the stories featured. He wrote about many of them on his personal Facebook page, and several people suggested he should start a group featuring his writings. Ian founded the Facebook group “Murders, Missing People and More Mysteries” in August of 2018 he writes about many cold cases. The group also features many current criminal cases in the news. When Ian isn’t writing, he enjoys exercising, traveling and collecting sports cards. He’s also a big animal lover (his Facebook nickname is “beagle lover.”)


Support Synova’s Cause:

EACH WEEK SYNOVA HIGHLIGHTS OBSCURE COLD CASES ON HER BLOG AS A VICTIMS’ ADVOCATE WITH MISSOURI MISSING ORGANIZATION. SHE NEVER CHARGES FOR HER SERVICES. IF YOU’D LIKE TO SUPPORT HER IN THIS WORTHY CAUSE, PLEASE CHECK OUT THE AFFILIATE LINKS ON THIS PAGE. BY PURCHASING ONE OF HER BOOKS, OR USING THESE LINKS YOU WILL BE SUPPORTING SYNOVA’S WORK ON COLD CASES AND WILL ENSURE HER ABILITY TO CONTINUE TO GIVE A VOICE TO THE VICTIM’S FAMILY.


If you enjoy this content don’t forget to sign up for Synova’s Weekly True Crime Newsletter. You will receive exclusive content directly in your inbox. As a gift for joining you will also receive the Grim Justice ebook free.

2ndDIYpackage-templates

SIGN UP HERE


Recommended Reading:

Follow the heart-rending cases Synova first wrote about on her blog in 2018. Filled with missing persons’ cases, unsolved homicides, and even serial killer cases, this book will give you a greater insight into the shattered lives behind every story. Cases Included in this book: Jayme Closs, Haley Owens, Josh Robinson, Timothy Cunningham, Carol Blades, Pam Hupp, Arthur Ream, Angela Hammond, The Springfield Three, Jennifer Harris, Danny King, Angie Yarnell, Jack Robinson, Madelin Edman, Alexis Patterson, Amber Wilde, Sandra Bertolas, Jennifer Casper-Ross, Crystal Soulier, Jody Ricard, Carmen Owens, Brandon Tyree McCullough & The I-70 Serial Killer.

A portion of the profits of this book will go to support the Missouri Missing Organization.


If you’d like to check out Synova’s true crime books follow this link to her Amazon Author Page.


ALL INFORMATION USED TO CREATE THIS CONTENT IS A MATTER OF PUBLIC RECORD AND CAN BE EASILY FOUND ONLINE OR CAN BE VERIFIED BY THE GUEST BLOGGER. ANY PARTICIPATION OR ALLEGED INVOLVEMENT OF ANY PARTY MENTIONED WITHIN THIS SITE IS PURELY SPECULATION. AS THE LAW STATES, AN INDIVIDUAL IS INNOCENT UNTIL PROVEN GUILTY. I DO NOT OWN THE PHOTOS USED IN THIS POST. ALL PHOTOS ARE USED UNDER THE FAIR USE ACT. NO COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT INTENDED. ANY AND ALL OPINIONS ARE THAT OF THE GUEST BLOGGER AND DON’T NECESSARILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF SYNOVA INK©2017-2019. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED


109 Yr Old Triple Murder Mystery – The Murder of Janie Sharp

Photo courtesy of Find A Grave

She was slaughtered while walking home along a country road in Rural Hill, Mississippi. Her murder leads to an overturned conviction, an acquittal, two more murders, and a trial that would divide the community. The local paper bred chaos and sensationalism, the truth was forgotten and 109 years later we still don’t know who killed Janie Sharp.


Peninnah Janie Sharp was born on April 14, 1892, to William and Martha Sharp. They had a large family with eight children. Janie was well-liked in the rural farming community and was an excellent dressmaker. On July 21, 1910, Janie helped her mother clean up the dishes from the noon meal before setting out to town. She walked the mile and a half to the local post office and then continued to the general store. She was seen leaving the store around 3 pm, but she never made it home.

By nightfall, the entire community was worried about the 18-year-old and several local men created a search party. Armed with torches they searched well up into the night until they finally broke up with a promise to resume searching in the morning.

Along the way home, Janie’s brother, Lee continued his search. He looked along the west side of the road and followed the ravine that leads down to the water. Around 2 am, a gruesome sight confronted him. There laying half-submerged in the muddy water was his sister. Her throat had been slashed from ear to ear. Several stab wounds were under her chin and she had suffered severe blunt force trauma to the head. The sight caused her brother to faint. I can’t imagine how horror-stricken the poor brother was after witnessing such a sight flickering in the light of his torch.

Lee Sharp began to scream for help and ran to find his father. William came and removed his daughter from the desolate site and carried her home. William Sharp suffered from palsy. The thought of this disabled father stumbling through the darkness trying to carry his child home is heart-wrenching, but this story is just beginning.

The next morning a crowd gathered including Sheriff Hull. The crime scene was examined and told a terrible tale. According to the footprints in the area and the strewn belongings of Ms. Sharp it appeared she put up quite a fight. Two to three areas looked as if a terrible scuffle had taken place and it looked like poor Janie had escaped her captor more than once. Who could have such a thing?

No one had noticed any strangers in the area and suspicions immediately fell on a local boy named Swinton Parmenter. Some say he was acting strangely during the search. Others say he had a thing for Janie, but nothing could be proven. Did that matter? No. Before nightfall, Permenter would be surrounded by a lynch mob. 

This tale is far from over. There will be a trial, actually two trials, a conviction, and an acquittal. Two more suspects will be named, and the investigator who found them will be brutally murdered. Swinton’s brother will be killed, and all the while a local paper will stir up a lynch mob. Unfortunately during all of this, the truth will be lost in t


THIS LIST OF LINKS IS NOT AN ALL-ENCOMPASSING SOURCE CITING. ALL OF THE INFORMATION USED IN THIS ARTICLE CAN BE EASILY FOUND ONLINE. LINKS BELOW WERE USED AS SOURCES AND ARE RECOMMENDED READING FOR SYNOVA’S READERS. SYNOVA STRIVES TO CITE ALL THE SOURCES USED DURING HER CASE STUDY, BUT OCCASIONALLY A SOURCE MAY BE MISSED BY MISTAKE. IT IS NOT INTENTIONAL, AND NO COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT IS INTENDED.

Further Reading:

Find A Grave

Reddit

Winston Web News Article (There is a series of eight articles on this site. Only the first article has been linked. I encourage you to read them all if you have time)


Recommended Reading:

You can read more about this case in Murder in Rural Hill by W. McCulley.


Support Synova’s Cause:

EACH WEEK SYNOVA HIGHLIGHTS OBSCURE COLD CASES ON HER BLOG AS A VICTIMS’ ADVOCATE WITH MISSOURI MISSING ORGANIZATION. SHE NEVER CHARGES FOR HER SERVICES. IF YOU’D LIKE TO SUPPORT HER IN THIS WORTHY CAUSE, PLEASE CHECK OUT THE AFFILIATE LINKS ON THIS PAGE. BY PURCHASING ONE OF HER BOOKS, OR USING THESE LINKS YOU WILL BE SUPPORTING SYNOVA’S WORK ON COLD CASES AND WILL ENSURE HER ABILITY TO CONTINUE TO GIVE A VOICE TO THE VICTIM’S FAMILY.


ALL INFORMATION USED TO CREATE THIS CONTENT IS A MATTER OF PUBLIC RECORD AND CAN BE EASILY FOUND ONLINE OR CAN BE VERIFIED BY THE GUEST BLOGGER. ANY PARTICIPATION OR ALLEGED INVOLVEMENT OF ANY PARTY MENTIONED WITHIN THIS SITE IS PURELY SPECULATION. AS THE LAW STATES, AN INDIVIDUAL IS INNOCENT UNTIL PROVEN GUILTY. I DO NOT OWN THE PHOTOS USED IN THIS POST. ALL PHOTOS ARE USED UNDER THE FAIR USE ACT. NO COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT INTENDED. ANY AND ALL OPINIONS ARE THAT OF THE GUEST BLOGGER AND DON’T NECESSARILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF SYNOVA INK©2017-2019. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.


If you enjoy this content don’t forget to sign up for Synova’s Weekly True Crime Newsletter. You will receive exclusive content directly in your inbox. As a gift for joining you will also receive the Grim Justice ebook free.

2ndDIYpackage-templates

SIGN UP HERE


If you’d like to check out Synova’s true crime books follow this link to her Amazon Author Page.

Synova’s Amazon Author Page


Guest Post Thursday – The Death of Dana Stidham

C:UsersCLIENTPictures1.jpg
Photos courtesy of Guest Blogger

Larry Stidham was feeling a bit under the weather on Tuesday, July 25, 1989. He was home sick, and his wife Georgia was at work. When his 18-year-old daughter Dana came home to do her laundry, Larry asked her to go to the store to get him some Alka-Seltzer. Dana was glad to help her ailing dad.

The following day, Larry felt much worse. He had not received his medicine, but a new ailment was weighing far more heavily on him. He was sick with worry as Dana had failed to return. Larry eventually recovered from his original illness, but his worry worsened with each passing day as Dana remained missing. The illness was contagious; it spread to family and friends.

On September 16, nearly two months after she left on the errand, the worry turned to grief, heartbreak and devastation as most of Dana’s remains were found in a wooded area.

Dana had most likely been stabbed to death. Thirty years later, no one has been charged with her murder.

Dana had recently graduated from Gravette High School in northwest Arkansas, only a few miles from the Missouri border. She lived in an apartment with her older brother, Larry, and another roommate in Centerton, seven miles north of her parents’ home in Hiawese.

At approximately 3:00 p.m., Dana drove her gray Dodge Omni to get her father’s medicine at the Phillips Foods store in Bella Vista, four miles away. She had previously worked there and several store employees and customers she knew recalled seeing her. She chatted a few minutes with some of them before purchasing the medicine and a couple of other small items. Nothing appeared amiss.

C:UsersCLIENTPictures1a.jpg

When the door swung open at the Stidhman home shortly after 4:00 p.m., Larry was hoping it was Dana. It was, however, Georgia coming arriving home from work. It was the only time in his life Larry was disappointed to see his wife, as his concern for his daughter was growing.

When told of the situation, Georgia said she would go look for Dana. Larry, despite not feeling well, insisted on going with her, thinking Dana may have encountered car trouble. After searching the entire afternoon and mid-evening, the Stidhams found no trace of their daughter or her car. Calls to Dana’s friends yielded no clues as well.

Larry and Georgia reported Dana missing at 9:15 p.m.

At 6:30 a.m. the following day, July 26, a policeman making her rounds found Dana’s car in the southbound lane of U.S. Highway 71 just north of the Bella Vista Town Centre.

The keys were still in the ignition and the driver’s side window was halfway down. The left-rear tire of the car was marginally deflated but the vehicle was still operable. The driver’s side seat was pushed far back, indicating someone much taller than the 5’2″ Dana was the last person to drive the car. Dana’s purse and its contents were missing. A receipt from Phillips Foods in the back of the car, time-stamped 3:17 p.m., was consistent with the time store employees remembered seeing Dana. Some of Dana’s laundry was discovered 1,700 feet from her car.

Larry and Georgia had searched that section of Highway 71 the previous evening but found no sign of Dana’s car. In addition, Arkansas State Troopers were running radar in the area until midnight and they, too, did not come across the car. Dana’s Omni had been abandoned along Highway 71 sometime in the early morning hours of July 26.

On August 5, one-and-a-half weeks after Dana’s abandoned car was located, a dog returned to his owner’s Bella Vista home carrying a treasure in his mouth. It was not a bone or an animal, but a woman’s purse. When the dog’s owner opened the purse, he was shocked by what he found. Several items bore the name of Dana Stidham.

Investigators searched the wooded area the dog frequented, just over a mile north of where Dana’s car was found. Strewn into the weeds alongside the road they found her driver’s license, checkbook, and several photos. Authorities believe the items had been thrown from a moving car.

Fearing the worst, volunteers joined police in combing the lakes and woods surrounding Bella Vista.

C:UsersCLIENTPictures1a.jpg

On September 16, seven weeks after she was last seen, a hunter’s grisly discovery brought the search for Dana Stidham to a devastating end. Most of her skeletal remains were found scattered along a creek bed in far eastern Bella Vista, close to the Missouri border. Her skull was intact, as was most of her jaw. Several pieces of her jewelry and the clothes she was wearing on the day she disappeared were found. The t-shirt she wore was plastered with several pieces of duct tape.

Evidence of stab nicks was found on Dana’s left shoulder blade and neck, but it could not be definitively determined how she had died because her sternum was never found, probably having been devoured by animals.

Dana had also likely been sexually assaulted, but her body was too decomposed to say for certain.

Though it had taken nearly two months to find Dana’s remains, it took authorities less than two minutes to develop a suspect in her murder.

Police were initially confused by why Dana had driven four miles to Bella Vista to get her father’s medicine when she could have gotten it at the Hiawese Dairy Freeze convenience store only a few blocks from the Stidham home in Hiawase. It was soon clear, however, why she bypassed the quicker option.

The Hiawese store was owned by the parents of Michael McMillan who was often at the store. He and Dana had gone to high school together and McMillan had asked her out multiple times. Dana was not interested in such a relationship and rejected him each time. She felt uncomfortable in his presence.

Even though it meant driving a few miles, Dana was more at ease picking up OTC medicine at the Bella Vista store.

In December of 1989, three months after Dana was buried, McMillan was arrested for stealing the temporary headstone on her grave. He admitted doing so, paid a fine, and said he committed the act because he wanted the marker as a memory of Dana.

Seven years later, investigators tracked down the truck McMillan had been driving on the night Dana disappeared. Its new owner allowed them to search the vehicle, and, despite the passage of several years, hair samples were found which closely matched Dana’s. They were, however, not enough to make a definitive match.

McMillan agreed to an interview with police and submitted to a polygraph test. He failed the polygraph test and during the interview, McMillan made a seemingly cryptic statement. He seemed devastated by Dana’s murder and said, “Sometimes I think I did kill Dana, but I know I didn’t.”

The court ordered McMillan to submit his hair samples to be tested against those found on Dana’s clothing. McMillan’s samples bore similarities to those found on the clothing, but, again, could not be deemed a 100% match.

The Benton County Prosecutor declined to charge McMillan with Dana’s murder, saying the evidence was not strong enough.

C:UsersCLIENTPictures1a.jpg

Another person of interest in Dana’s murder is Orville Goodwin. In 2013, he was convicted of attempted murder after shooting a woman in the face. Police have not confirmed if Goodwin knew Dana, only saying advancements in technology have led them to investigate him.

C:UsersCLIENTPictures1a.jpg

 Thirty years after her brutal murder, no one has been charged with the murder of Dana Stidham.


THIS LIST OF LINKS IS NOT AN ALL-ENCOMPASSING SOURCE CITING. ALL OF THE INFORMATION USED IN THIS ARTICLE CAN BE EASILY FOUND ONLINE. LINKS BELOW WERE USED AS SOURCES AND ARE RECOMMENDED READING FOR SYNOVA’S READERS. SYNOVA STRIVES TO CITE ALL THE SOURCES USED DURING HER CASE STUDY, BUT OCCASIONALLY A SOURCE MAY BE MISSED BY MISTAKE. IT IS NOT INTENTIONAL, AND NO COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT IS INTENDED.


Further Reading:

Dateline NBC

Yourtango

Reddit


ALL INFORMATION USED TO CREATE THIS CONTENT IS A MATTER OF PUBLIC RECORD AND CAN BE EASILY FOUND ONLINE OR CAN BE VERIFIED BY THE GUEST BLOGGER. ANY PARTICIPATION OR ALLEGED INVOLVEMENT OF ANY PARTY MENTIONED WITHIN THIS SITE IS PURELY SPECULATION. AS THE LAW STATES, AN INDIVIDUAL IS INNOCENT UNTIL PROVEN GUILTY. I DO NOT OWN THE PHOTOS USED IN THIS POST. ALL PHOTOS ARE USED UNDER THE FAIR USE ACT. NO COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT INTENDED. ANY AND ALL OPINIONS ARE THAT OF THE GUEST BLOGGER AND DON’T NECESSARILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF SYNOVA INK©2017-2019. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.


More About Our Wonderful Guest Blogger:

Ian Granstra is a writer and a native Iowan now living in  Arkansas.Growing up, he enjoyed watching real-life crime shows and further researching the stories featured. He wrote about many of them on his personal Facebook page, and several people suggested he should start a group featuring his writings. Ian founded the Facebook group “Murders, Missing People and More Mysteries” in August of 2018 he writes about many cold cases. The group also features many current criminal cases in the news. When Ian isn’t writing, he enjoys exercising, traveling and collecting sports cards. He’s also a big animal lover (his Facebook nickname is “beagle lover.”)

Recommended Reading: 


Support Synova’s Cause:

EACH WEEK SYNOVA HIGHLIGHTS OBSCURE COLD CASES ON HER BLOG AS A VICTIMS’ ADVOCATE WITH MISSOURI MISSING ORGANIZATION. SHE NEVER CHARGES FOR HER SERVICES. IF YOU’D LIKE TO SUPPORT HER IN THIS WORTHY CAUSE, PLEASE CHECK OUT THE AFFILIATE LINKS ON THIS PAGE. BY PURCHASING ONE OF HER BOOKS, OR USING THESE LINKS YOU WILL BE SUPPORTING SYNOVA’S WORK ON COLD CASES AND WILL ENSURE HER ABILITY TO CONTINUE TO GIVE A VOICE TO THE VICTIM’S FAMILY.


If you enjoy this content don’t forget to sign up for Synova’s Weekly True Crime Newsletter. You will receive exclusive content directly in your inbox. As a gift for joining you will also receive the Grim Justice ebook free.

2ndDIYpackage-templates

SIGN UP HERE


If you’d like to check out Synova’s true crime books follow this link to her Amazon Author Page.

Synova’s Amazon Author Page


C:UsersCLIENTPictures1a.jpg

Mobster Monday: Dixie Mafia Hitman – Bill Clubb

Photo courtesy of Worthpoint

Dixie Mafia Hitman, implicated in the Gypsy Camp Murder, never faces justice for the murder of Gypsy Queen Margie George. Bill Clubb, along with his cohorts, Kirksey Nix, Jr, and three others walk free after the state’s witness is found shot dead beside the road just outside of Shreveport.


William Mansker “Bill” Clubb was a 6’3″ good ‘ol’ boy from Dixieland. He seemed to be a polite, soft-spoken gentleman who loved custom suits and handmade cowboy boots. Those who crossed him knew of his darker side.

Bill Clubb was a highly skilled thief, safecracker, and hired hitman. He was one of five men to be implicated in the Gypsy Camp Murder, but he never faced justice for this crime.

February 18, 1969, five masked men stormed in into a gypsy camp of carnival workers. The band was parked in the Skeebow Trailer Court off of Lake Pontchartrain just outside of New Orleans.

Rumors swirled around the traveling carnival workers. Amid the carnie camp was a safe rumored to hold hundreds of thousands of dollars. This tall tale caught the attention of local Dixie Mafia members, and soon a robbery would be planned.

Mardi Gras was in full swing, and most of the camp’s men were away working, leaving the women and children alone and unprotected. Twenty four people were bound with chains, and their homes ransacked.

The armed gunmen came up with a few thousand dollars worth of cash and jewelry. Some reports claim the gypsies lost close to $40,000, but they claimed the amount was much smaller to avoid problems over unclaimed income.

Whatever the case, the total was much less than the Dixie Mafia crew expected. The Gypsy Queen, Margie George, was taken and beaten in an attempt to find the elusive safe. George refused to talk and became belligerent. Instead of realizing their error and leaving with the money, one robber hit the woman over the head with a hatchet. Another gunman shot her shortly after that to put her out of her misery. The poor woman was only 44.

A local Dixie Mafia thief was arrested almost immediately. Bobbie Gail Gwenn quickly spilled the story and implicated Dixie Mafia Kingpin, Kirksey Nix, Jr, Bill Clubb, and three other men.

Clubb was arrested two days later with $9,000 in cash and a loaded .38 caliber pistol. Police then raided his home and found several guns and an assortment of burglary tools. Some of the weapons were traced back to a home robbery in Ormond Beach, Florida.

Clubb fought extradition to Louisana and succeeded in stalling the process. He was eventually extradited to Louisiana, but it was too late. Just before Clubb was transferred, the stool pigeon was found shot dead beside the road.

One other hitman implicated in the Gypsy Camp Raid, Gary Elbert McDaniel, was found dead in the Sabine River. His death brought on a giant controversy. McDaniel was rumored to be involved in the ambush of Buford Pusser on New Hope Rd. Some wonder if the revenge filled Sheriff could have taken out the killer, or if he was silenced by his own people because he was rumored to be working with authorities.

After the death of Bobby Gwenn, the case against Nix and Clubb fell apart, and Clubb was released. He would continue to have run-ins with law enforcement for the next 13 years.

Clubb was a pilot and used his skills to run drugs throughout the Southern states for the Dixie Mafia. On June 5, 1982, his Piper Cherokee plane crashed just outside of Houston. The soft-spoken killer was dead at 55.


ALL INFORMATION USED TO CREATE THIS CONTENT IS A MATTER OF PUBLIC RECORD AND CAN BE EASILY FOUND ONLINE OR CAN BE VERIFIED BY THE GUEST BLOGGER. ANY PARTICIPATION OR ALLEGED INVOLVEMENT OF ANY PARTY MENTIONED WITHIN THIS SITE IS PURELY SPECULATION. AS THE LAW STATES, AN INDIVIDUAL IS INNOCENT UNTIL PROVEN GUILTY. I DO NOT OWN THE PHOTOS USED IN THIS POST. ALL PHOTOS ARE USED UNDER THE FAIR USE ACT. NO COPYRIGHT INFRINGEMENT INTENDED. ANY AND ALL OPINIONS ARE THAT OF THE GUEST BLOGGER AND DON’T NECESSARILY REFLECT THE VIEWS OF SYNOVA INK©2017-2019. ALL RIGHTS RESERVED.

Further Reading:

http://www.texarkanagazette.com/news/texarkana/story/2013/dec/02/dixie-mafia/295497/

https://www.newspapers.com/US/Florida/Orlando/The%20Orlando%20Sentinel_4644

https://www.worthpoint.com/worthopedia/1957-fbi-wanted-poster-william-1900773718


Preorder your copy today!

Back Cover Summary:

Deep in the heart of Dixie lies a hidden evil. It’s tentacles stretch from state to state, from county to county. The Dixie Mafia has produced infamous outlaws, bank robbers, and murderers. The story contains tidbits from each of their lives and even includes the story of a famous sheriff, but this book is not about them.

Silenced by the Dixie Mafia is about a big sister who has fought for answers for over five decades. It’s about a father who was an ex-alcoholic turned into a gambling addict. A father’s decisions would lead to the death of his disabled son and eventually lead to his own demise. Now left alone to find answers and make sense of the chaos is a brave little southern belle named Phyllis. 

Tying back to the ambush of Sheriff Buford Pusser on August 12, 1967, this story will change history as we know it. The world knew nothing about the Dixie Mafia until the murders of Judge Vincent Sherry and his wife Margaret in 1987. This public assassination brought this band of ruthless criminals into view, but the truth was still hidden until the death of the Andersons.

 Preorder Your Book Here


If you enjoy this content don’t forget to sign up for Synova’s Weekly True Crime Newsletter. You will receive exclusive content directly in your inbox. As a gift for joining you will also receive the Grim Justice ebook free.

2ndDIYpackage-templates

SIGN UP HERE


If you’d like to check out Synova’s true crime books follow this link to her Amazon Author Page.

Synova’s Amazon Author Page


Shattered: behind every story is a shattered life

Every year Synova compiles the most popular blog post from the previous year into a case files book. In 2018, Synova Ink was filled with serial killer cases, cold cases, famous cases, and many obscure unsolved missing persons’ cases. Don’t miss this one. 

Order your copy of Synova’s New Casefiles book HERE!


Synova’s Swag Store is now open check out her new merchandise by clicking on the Shop! link at the top of this page!

Come Quick!